Trooper Traverse Intro & Index

Trooper Traverse — Introduction to our Complete Website Information Archive
Honoring the Soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division

[click here for route details]

During February of 1944, a small group of 10th Mountain Division soldiers made a winter crossing of the huge snow-covered mountains between Leadville and Aspen, Colorado. Their four day trip, on skis in the highest mountains in the Rockies, was an audacious statement of skill, poise, rugged self-reliance — and the attraction of Aspen.

While legends of the trooper traverse circulated for years, details of the route remained untold. In 2000, well known ski mountaineer and writer Louis Dawson began researching the route by contacting surviving veterans and sifting through archives. He found a wealth of material, but realized that the only way to truly know the trooper traverse was to do it himself. Teaming up with photographers Brian Litz and Chris Clark, Dawson repeated the route in late winter of 2001.

Louis Dawson skis from Darling Pass during the 2001 Trooper Traverse.

Louis Dawson skis from Darling Pass during the 2001 Trooper Traverse.

Dawson’s ensuing work at documenting the Trooper Traverse (here on WildSnow.com and elswhere), blends original historic photos of the soldier’s trip with Brian Litz shots of his 2001 journey, for an unforgettable view of what Dawson calls “the perfect trip.”

What’s more, in his exposital work Dawson details the heroic combat of the 10th during W.W.II, and the immense influence the 10th Mountain Division had on the ski and outdoor industry in America when they returned from the war.

Overall route, Trooper Traverse, Colorado.

Overall route, Trooper Traverse, Colorado. Click to enlarge.

“From the start, it was obvious to me that one of the trooper’s main goals was to enjoy the mountains before they crossed the sea to harm’s way,” says Dawson. “Trooper Richard Rocker later wrote that it was one of the more ‘memorable occasions of the Camp Hale experience.'”

“Indeed,” says Lou, “our re-creation of the trip turned out to be one of the best times I’ve had in my career as a ski mountaineer. There is nothing like combining Colorado’s mountains, snow, skis, good companions and rich history — those are the ingredients for the perfect ski mountaineering trip.”

10th Mountain troopers crest the Continental Divide during their historic 1944 ski traverse from Leadville to Aspen, Colorado.

10th Mountain troopers crest the Continental Divide during their historic 1944 ski traverse from Leadville to Aspen, Colorado. Click to enlarge.

(Exact dates for original Trooper Traverse: February 21-24, 1944. The soldiers arrived in Aspen on the 24th, spent the night in town and were trucked back to Camp Hale during the afternoon of February 25th.)

[feature article]

[route details]

[Roster of men on original trip.]

[Richard Rocker account of original trip.]

[Burdell Winter eulogy]

[90 Pounds of Rucksack, 10th Mountain marching song.]

Following copyrighted downloads are for media or personal use by permission only:

[download high-res print version of ski photo]

[download high-res print version of Lou mug, credit Joe McBride]


[download high-res print version of Ralph Ball photo, with caption, credit Ralph Ball Collection]


  Your Comments

  • See: If you want to make your own template, here’s how I do it. Get a couple pie...
  • Greg Louie: MIght have been me. I use a sharpened ice pick to mark the pinhole, then pr...
  • Jim Milstein: I think tri-square is better spelled try square. It's used to try squarenes...
  • altis: A woodworking gauge works well too: http://warringtonbears.org.uk/insert...
  • Spencer: I like to use a centering ruler combined with a normal set of calipers. You...
  • atfred: I've used your paper folding method - works great, quite ingenious....
  • Harryanealiv: i just did this drive last week, south to north, in an old Volvo station wa...
  • Dalethemale: Can you take a touring motorcycle through the Irish Canyon? How often do ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: It's just hooked up to an existing system like any other RV or mobile home ...
  • Crazy Horse: Another solution that readily finds the white-out pen on the editor's desk:...
  • Bill B: Hey Lou How does ASC manage the sewage from the tiny houses?...
  • Crazy Horse: I worked on a house in Teton Village three years ago where the construction...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Thanks Crazy, excellent op ed. I'd add that another part of economics has t...
  • Crazy Horse: Lou, like most articles in the liberal press, the one you quote tries to de...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Thom, thanks, just to be clear to our readers, the ski's _bottom steel edge...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Crazy, this 2014 article about Jackson and tiny houses is pretty good, stil...
  • Thom Mackris: Hi Lou, In addition to the extra work on your part, I don't think you'd ...
  • Crazy Horse: The traditional Western approach to getting rid of unwanted predators was t...
  • Andy Carey: The tiny house for the employee reminds me of the numerous timber towns in...
  • cam shute: thanks for the shout out Lou!...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Bruno, I think that's above my pay grade in my level of economics education...
  • L: Any word on last width? Volume?...
  • Bruno Schull: Hi Lou. I have what is probably a silly question. Instead of all those tr...
  • See: Regarding solar panel efficiency: I recently got an Anker 15 watt solar usb...
  • Scott Allen: 100 years old and making snow turns! That was inspiring....it's hot here ...
  • Nate C: I think the Wasatch would lose a lot of its character if there weren't peop...
  • OMR: Good points Lou. I for one do not pull out the drone if I know other skiers...
  • Shane: I had my first "drone experience" last weekend when my wife and I were lazi...
  • Hacksaw: Careful Lou, some S&R teams are getting drones. Know before you shoot....
  • Lou Dawson 2: OMR, sure, I enjoy the amazing creative results of drone photography as muc...

  Recent Posts


Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

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