Binding Museum

Welcome to the online museum of backcountry skiing — AT randonnee ski touring binding room. Through years of testing and product development, backcountry skiing bindings have progressed from simple cable bindings to engineered machines that represent state-of-art materials science and mechanicals. This collection of ski touring bindings covers the full historical range of modern bindings, with emphasis on bindings that latch down at the heel for downhill mode, yet allow a free lifting heel for touring and climbing. Your ideas and insights about these ski mountaineering bindings form an important part of this interactive museum — please make comments by using the "leave blog comment" link for each display. In particular, we clearly need help dating the bindings. (We are in the process of arranging the list first by brand, then by date for each brand group.)

Alpine Trekker touring adapter
(Early 1990s, Heavy but functional solution, out of production.)
Alpiine Trekker backcountry skiing binding adapter.
(Dynafit) Low Tech pre production
leave comment about this binding
(Pre Production 1982-1983, based on Ramer binding.)
Pre production backcountry skiing binding, Dynafit Low Tech.
Low Tech (Dynafit) backcountry skiing binding, first productin model.
Low Tech (Dynafit) classic backcountry skiing binding.
Dynafit Tourlite Tech TLT 1993
Dynafit Tri-Step ski touring binding 2001-2003.
Emery Altitude ski touring binding, 1st gen, 1970s
Emery Medium
[leave blog comment]
(No vertical release, for approach..)
Emery Emerey Medium backcountry skiing approach binding.
Emery Energy 1990s
[leave blog comment]
(Interesting touring pivot.)
Emery Energy ski touring binding.
Emery Chrono 1991
[leave blog comment]
(Unusual binding, rubber band release.)
Emery Chrono 1991
Emery A-LX 1990s
[leave blog comment]
(One of the last Emery bindings.)
Emery Chrono 1991

Fritschi Freeride Plus 2006
(Major upgrade of this line.)

Fritschi Freeride Plus
Fritschi Diamir Titanal 1995
(First Diamir model.)

[leave blog comment about this binding]

Fritschi Diamir Titanal

Fritschi FT88 ski binding
[leave a comment about this binding]
(First Fritschi binding, 1982.)

Fritschi FT88

Gertsch Binding Touring Adapter
[blog comments]
(Unusual solution, 1971.)

Gertsch ski touring binding.
Iser backcountry skiing binding.

Geze Touring Adapter – late 1960s
[leave a blog comment reGeze
(With heel lift that was ahead of its time.)

Geze ski touring adapter system.

Marker Duke 2007
[blog comments]
(First modern "freeride")

Marker Duke ski binding.

Marker M Tour 1982
[blog comments]
(Amazing high tech features.)

Marker M Tour

Marker Rotomat TR Tour 1960s
[blog comments]
(Simple and effective.)

Marker TR Tour
Petzl backcountry skiing binding.

Ramer Comfort backcountry binding
[blog comments]

Ramer Comfort backcountry skiing binding.

Ramer model R (aluminum) 1978
[comment on this binding]

Ramer Model R aluminum

Ramer Universal randonnee binding
[comment on this binding]

Ramer Universal backcountry skiing binding.

Ramer Universal "Military" binding
[comment on this binding]

Ramer Military skiing binding.

Ramer MT-2000
[blog comments about ski binding]

Ramer MT-2000

Ramy-Securus 1957

Ramy-Securus
Salewa Tour backcountry skiing binding.
Sumatic Champion ski touring binding.
Sumatic Champion ski touring binding.
Secura-Fix Touring Adapter
[blog comments]
(Flawed solution to an age old problem.)
Secura-Fix
Silvretta Pure Freeride binding.
Silvretta SL backcountry skiing binding.

Silvretta 300 randonnee binding
[blog comments]

Silvretta 300 ski binding.

Silvretta 500 – 1999
[leave Silvretta 500 comments]
(Lighter wieight remake of model 404)

Silvretta 404 randonnee binding
[blog comments]

Silvretta 404
Silvretta Saas Fee

Tyrolia Tour randonnee binding
[blog comments]
(1959 binding, transition from cable.)

Tyrolia cable binding.

Tyrolia TRB 1982
[blog comments]
(Unique double pivot, but heavy.)

Tyrolia TRB ski binding.
Zermatt Nepal 1975
[blog comments]
(Massive, similar to Iser)
Zermatt Nepal ski binding.
Gamma – Poland 1980s
[blog comments]
(Surreptitiously made in the communist shipyards.)
Travers Polish ski binding.

Backcountry skiing bindings we’re seeking: While our 50+ piece collection (not all are online yet) comprises nearly every alpine touring binding made, we still need to acquire the purple version of the Fritschi FT88, CM Grande Randonee, as well as any exotics or one-offs. Will buy (low budget), or we can trade another classic or antique from our extensive backcountry skiing binding collection. Please use our contact link in our main menu.

Note, it is common to see vintage and classic backcountry ski bindings on Ebay being sold as if they’re modern functional units. Be advised that spare parts and support usually do not exist for such bindings, and they may have problems with durability of aged plastic or compromised safety release (many, if not most early AT randonnee ski touring bindings fall into that category). Would you buy and use an alpine skiing binding from 20 years ago, and trust it? Or for that matter, a two decades old set of tires for your car? If not, why do the same with a ski touring binding you depend on for your safety or even life?

If you find alpine touring backcountry skiing bindings on Ebay, and they’re priced "too good to be true," they probably are. If you have purchased such bindings and are less than satisfied after you’ve used them, before tossing in the trash please contact us for a possible buy or trade. The ancient used bindings you got suckered into buying might not be appropriate for skiing, but they might fit in the WildSnow collection!

  Your Comments

  • ptor: Actually I'm working on a sponsorship deal with Ferrari to drive a GTC4 Lus...
  • John Duke: Bohemia is as Homegrown as Midwest skiing gets. As a Michigan native, and N...
  • jasper: Im going to hike so fast this year. ??...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Ptor gets it. On the other hand, I heard he's driving a Citroen 2CV these d...
  • ptor: Rush Red Barchetta,,, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAvQSkK8Z8U...
  • Lou Dawson 2: I got an espresso maker that'll most likely run off the Arcteryx battery. S...
  • Lou Dawson 2: P.S., no question about history is silly, in our opinion here at WildSnow.c...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Official, Tour Lite Tech, first binding to come from Dynafit licensing the ...
  • Geewilligers: Lou, This is a silly question, but what does TLT stand for? Thanks, ...
  • Sedgesprite: "The best day of the war. The day I remember the best, was the day it was o...
  • Bill H: Bright side of self-driving cars: It's going to make point-to-point shu...
  • rob glieden: Bohemia is pretty legit. It belongs in your post Lou as the drive up the pe...
  • Aaron Mattix: Bohemia has been high on my radar of interest. Would love to hear more feed...
  • JCoates: Lou, I grew up in rural Montana so "I get it" when you're talking about the...
  • Maciej Pike-Biegunski: Lou, I abandoned heavy "beef" boots years ago. The marginal gain in ski ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Jake, I tested on bench, forward-upward release is fine, heel to the side (...
  • Chris: Clean, affordable, and efficient mass transit (whatever form that might tak...
  • Jeremy C: Unfortunately for anyone who likes driving, self drive cars will slowly ero...
  • Lou Dawson 2: In Western Europe, I sure see a lot of people driving... it's not the nirva...
  • Shar: If your subways cars are "grunged out", then that is a reflection of the la...
  • Maz: So when you're in Europe, how do you enjoy the "grunged out subway cars and...
  • zippy the pinhead: Rob, Answer to your question seems to be "yes". https://www.google.com/...
  • peterk: More features than an Alien: carbon, powerstrap-buckle, dual durometer sole...
  • rob trauscht: Possibly dumb question on the soles, but is anyone resoling AT boots? Seem...
  • Scott S Allen: Thanks Lou for the feed back, I really appreciate it! I have worked with B...
  • Topi: I have used Mammut RAS Light 30 for two past seasons (Euro). No durability ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: All fine Dave, appreciate the industry voice chiming in here with useful st...
  • Mammut Dave: Forgot to mention--regarding durability, with any of these light packs you ...
  • Mammut Dave: Harpo and Lou--a bit of info on the light fabric from Mammut. These two pa...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Maciej, in my opinion not quite a stiff feeling as TLT6-P, a bit stiffer th...

  Recent Posts


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Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

All material on this website is copyrighted, the name WildSnow is trademarked, permission required for reproduction (electronic or otherwise) and display on other websites. PLEASE SEE OUR COPYRIGHT and TRADEMARK INFORMATION.

Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use.

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