Dynafit Skiing Bindings – Info Index

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), Tricks, and Tips
Dynafit Tourlite Tech (TLT), Comfort, Vertical ST & FT Radical, randonnee “AT” Ski Bindings

Dynafit Radical ST backcountry skiing binding.

Dynafit Radical ST backcountry skiing binding, this model first introduced for 2011-2012 season. Main changes over previous are an entirely redesigned heel lift system, as well as metal 'power towers' in the toe that may help with binding entry and possibly help prevent inadvertent release in downhill mode. Sister model to this binding is the TLT Radical FT, only difference being a connector plate between toe and heel, and the ability to set higher release values (12 instead of 10)

Dynafit TLT model of backcountry skiing binding.

Dynafit TLT model of backcountry skiing binding. This model began sales in the early 1990s (the version pictured) and was still in production through 2011, called TLT Speed. The binding has been available in numerous color schemes over the years, all offerings have been nearly identical in mechanical parts. Ski brakes were formerly available for the TLT but are no longer manufactured.

(While our Dynafit backcountry skiing binding information is far superior to anything else in the world, or for that matter the universe, in the unlikely event the links below don’t help you please contact Salewa North America, 303-444-0446, email custsv using the dynafit.us domain )

Main Dynafit Bindings FAQ (check this first)

How to Use Dynafit Bindings – Video

How do safety release adjustments on most Dynafit bindings and many other tech type bindings.

Click-Clack retrofit Dynafit heel lifter – review

Dynafit Tri-Step Bindings FAQ

Dynafit Binding Mounting Instructions & Template Jig

How to install and remove Dynafit ski binding brakes

How to break down and assemble the heel unit — technical.

Randonnee Backcountry Skiing Bindings Torque Test

Retrofit Dynafit Binding fittings in your ski boots? — homebrew mod

Garage built "ejector" device for changing Dynafit mode

Museum Display — Original 1993 Dynafit Tourlite Tech

Blog post and comments about Dynafit rando binding durability

Dynafit backcountry skiing binding heel spacing tips and tricks

Lubrication of Dynafit backcountry skiing binding.

Blockage of Dynafit binding screw inserts, how to fix.

Installation of OEM Dynafit Anti Twist Anti Rotation device for Radical series bindings.

Another view of Dynafit and tech binding history.

What is the Dynafit binding?
Dynafit is a backcountry skiing binding that allows you to ski downhill with your boot attached to your ski the same way a regular alpine ski binding functions, yet transforms into a touring/climbing binding for skiing uphill or across level ground with your heels free to move up and down. The binding is available in numerous models. The TLT Speed (Tour Lite Tech) has been available for several decades. We have used the TLT extensively and highly recommend it as well as the Dynafit Comfort, ST and FT model offerings, as well as the TLT Radical FT and TLT Radical ST. Note that this TYPE of backcountry skiing binding is commonly called a “tech” binding. “Dynafit” is a brand.

Below, Dynafit models generally available for 2014/2015 season:

– TLT Radical FT (new in 2011, redesigned heel lift & more, heel elasticity added for winter 2014.)

– TLT Radical ST (new in 2011, redesigned heel lift & more)

– TLT Vertical FT (introduced for 2006/2007, still viable, buy with wide brakes and Power Blocks for what’s perhaps the best Dynafit binding ever made. Manufacturing is discontinued.)

– TLT Vertical ST (introduced for 2007/2008, still viable. Manufacturing is discontinued.)

– TLT Radical ST Baltoro (orange plastic otherwise same as Radical ST.)

– TLT Speed (Classic introduced in early 1990s, see photo above)

– TLT Speed Radical (New version of Speed, another sweet spot in the line, no brakes.)

– TLT Speed Superlight (racing & lightweight tour, one adjustment for release values.)

– Low Tech Radical (combines lighter heel unit with TLT Radical toe)

– Beast 16 (Heavy duty “freeride” binding with additional elasticity.)

– Low Tech Race (same heel as Low Tech Radical, special race toe, very light at around 115 grams. Original versions lock into touring mode when you step in, later versions may not per new racing regulations.)

Dynafit non race bindings 2015-2016.

Dynafit non race bindings 2015-2016 from Dynafit catalog. Click to enlarge.

(Please note: A discontinued Dynafit version known as the Tri-Step is available on the used market and is similar to the TLT and Comfort (it uses a Comfort heel and slightly modified TLT toe). We do not recommend the Tri-Step.)

GET A GOOD DEAL ON DYNAFIT BINDINGS!

Main Dynafit Bindings FAQ

  Your Comments

  • See: Looks like it could be a nice, cheap, light bit of emergency gear, but (for...
  • See: The coolest aspect of this device, in my opinion, is the graph. It looks li...
  • Lee Lau: That is so incredibly cool!...
  • Lou Dawson 2: More from Matt at Atomic: "The Nm rating of 130 is actually just a coinc...
  • Jack: Lou, re: foot/leg Find someone who repairs/rebuilds prosthetics, or find...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Thanks Tom, I have fun learning about the tech stuff but definitely don't h...
  • Tom Gos: Lou, with regard to your torque math you are correct about the 50cm lever a...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Concern is that air convection within the cells will make the jacket work p...
  • Carl: I have found how the boot is buckled has a huge flex impact as well. Boots...
  • Carl: looks like a great thing to have in the pack. Site looks like it works, di...
  • Jack: hmmm. I wonder how hard it would be to instrument the boot liner to measu...
  • Omekim: Ummm.... The machine looks to be at room temperature. They should probably ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Tom, it would be easy to do something crude using a torque wrench on an art...
  • Lou Dawson 2: From what I know, unlikely all the boot flex ratings in the industry are an...
  • Tom Gos: Lou, I seem to remember that back in the '80s Ski Magazine (the American on...
  • Bill H: Maybe SkiAlper can rent some time on the machine for next year's issue :)...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Hi Greg, I did have a graphic at one time but I don't recall it having reso...
  • Greg: I remember there being an image of the D scale at some point – with resort ...
  • Hans D.: Great advice. I hadn't thought about the "quickstep" notch, but now that y...
  • Dean Gagnon: Hello, Does anyone know where to get spare hinges for the tounge of the ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Billy Goat, IMHO the Amer (Salomon) binding is not a done deal, it will be ...
  • Rod Georgiu: Good idea...
  • zak: Any idea on if/when Scarpa will update the F1 to include the tech from the ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: I'll say it. Many Dynafit ski models are built to be lightweight and not pa...
  • Tomas: Destruction topsheet - only 2 days during normal telemark skiing. I'm wait...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Glad you liked the photos, was a fun day with you guys. Main thing, just gi...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Agree, someone needs to forget about TUV and all that sort of thing and jus...
  • szaraz levente: I do not need a TUV certificate brake, I only hate the wire wich connect me...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Hans, the best thing to do is put your boot-binding combo on a release test...
  • Hans D.: Regarding touring boots with swappable soles for alpine use: I have Lupo TI...

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Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

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Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use.

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