Marker M-Tour Ski Touring Binding

Marker M-Tour is possibly the most fully featured AT ski touring binding ever made. In stores circa 1982 – 1985, the binding included adjustable fore/aft boot position, an adjustable plate return spring, an emergency release lever on the heel and more. While heavy, the binding is quite functional and was put to good use during its era.

Complete Marker M Tour backcountry skiing binding shown above. Binding is in tour mode with heel lift up. Click here for massive enlargement.

Complete Marker M Tour backcountry skiing binding shown above. Binding is in tour mode with heel lift up. Click here for massive enlargement.

The M-Tour binding has two unusual adjustments. Arrow to left points to a nut you rotate to move the toe bail forward and backward, thus allowing exact placement of your boot for/aft position on the ski. I know of no other binding that has this feature. Very nice if you're sharing the binding among different people, or want to experiment with boot positions.

The M-Tour binding has two unusual adjustments. Arrow to left points to a nut you rotate to move the toe bail forward and backward, thus allowing exact placement of your boot for/aft position on the ski. I know of no other binding that has this feature. Very nice if you’re sharing the binding among different people, or want to experiment with boot positions.

M-Tour ski touring binding has the usual return spring that pulls the plate down to the ski in touring mode, only this return spring has adjustable tension. In photo above, arrow to right points to the return spring tension indicator, adjustment of this is done by rotating a set screw hidden in the far right end of the binding. While this feature is unnecessary in the light of modern backcountry skiing, it is somewhat fascinating it was included. Kind of a “because we can” little thing from Marker’s genius engineers.

Heel detail in touring mode, with heel lift in raised position.

Heel detail in touring mode, with heel lift in raised position.

You switch to downhill ski mode by dropping the end of the plate down in front of the large red lever, which you press on to move a small steel tongue that fits in a slot in the crosspiece at the end of the plate. Video makes this clear. The obvious red lever on the boot heel clamp releases the boot with light finger pressure, presumably for use if you’re hanging by one ski in a crevasse or something like that.

Upward (vertical) release is provided by the alpine-like heel clamp as shown in the photos. Side release is less obvious, provided by the whole heel assembly sliding to the side. What’s interesting is when the assembly moves to the side it releases the boot heel clamp using the same mechanism the red lever is attached to, thus causing a quick and complete release of boot from binding.

Underside of heel unit, arrow indicates scale for lateral release setting. For boot length adjustment this assembly slides on the binding rails when you move the tabs visible above and below the scale.

Underside of heel unit, arrow indicates scale for lateral release setting. For boot length adjustment this assembly slides on the binding rails when you move the tabs visible above and below the scale.

Weight (one binding with screws): 46.1 oz, 1306 gr

Thanks goes to Njord for donating these ski bindings to the museum.

Marker M-Tour thumbnail.

Marker M-Tour thumbnail.


  Your Comments


  Recent Posts




Facebook Twitter Google Instagram Youtube

WildSnow Twitter Feed



 



  • Blogroll & Links


  • Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

    All material on this website is copyrighted, the name WildSnow is trademarked, permission required for reproduction (electronic or otherwise) and display on other websites. PLEASE SEE OUR COPYRIGHT and TRADEMARK INFORMATION.

    We include "affiliate sales" links with most of our blog posts. This means we receive a percentage of a sale if you click over from our site (at no cost to you). None of our affiliate commission links are direct relationships with specific gear companies or shopping carts, instead we remain removed by using a third party who manages all our affiliate sales and relationships. We also sell display "banner" advertising, in this case our relationships are closer to the companies who advertise, but our display advertising income is carefully separated financially and editorially from our blog content, over which we always maintain 100% editorial control -- we make this clear during every advertising deal we work out. Please also notice we do the occasional "sponsored" post, these are under similar financial arrangements as our banner advertising, only the banner or other type of reference to a company are included in the blog post, simply to show they provided financial support to WildSnow.com and provide them with advertising in return. Unlike most other "sponsored content" you find on the internet, our sponsored posts are entirely under our editorial control and created by WildSnow specific writers.See our full disclosures here.

    Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. Due to human error and passing time, the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use.

    Switch To Mobile Version