Iser Ski Touring Binding 1970s

This is one of our favorite collection pieces. The Iser was quite prevalent in the 1970s era. While heavy at a whooping 32 ounces a pair, the binding’s simple engineering was appealing.

Iser alpine touring binding in uphill mode.

Iser alpine touring binding in uphill mode.

Vertical heel release is provided by the classic Marker heel unit seen on so many touring bindings of this era. Unlike other rigid plate/frame designs, the Iser uses a flexible plastic plate to connect toe and heel. Heel latchdown is accomplished by bending the plate upwards and inserting a tab in a catch (see photo below), an ingenious way of solving a sometimes complex engineering problem.

Heel latchdown is done by bending the plastic plate up in the middle, thus allowing a tab on the rear of the binding to slip under a catch.

Heel latchdown is done by bending the plastic plate up in the middle, thus allowing a tab on the rear of the binding to slip under a catch.

Rear area of plastic plate included a molded logo, as well as a sticker showing how to convert the binding between 'tour' and 'piste.'

Rear area of plastic plate included a molded logo, as well as a sticker showing how to convert the binding between ‘tour’ and ‘piste.’

Toe unit details

Toe unit details.

Toe height adjustment is easily done by rotating the vertical threaded rods with a screw driver. Lateral release is a cam and spring system similar to most other release binding of this era, with tension adjusted by rotating the red cap with the crossed slots. What’s interesting about the toe release is that the springs are oriented totally perpendicular to the for/aft axis of the binding, thus eliminating bulk on the front of the toe unit that would obstruct movement of the binding in touring mode. This problem of providing release but not obstructing movement is an engineering dilemma common to most randonnee bindings and has been solved in numerous ways.

This is another model of the binding, probably later. The heel latch worked by sliding for and aft, controled by the rotating dial on the right. Photo thanks to Raul Tapia.

This is another model of the binding, probably later. The heel latch worked by sliding fore and aft, controlled by the rotating dial on the right. Photo thanks to Raul Tapia.

Thanks goes to Frank Mattheus for his kind donation of these bindings to the collection.

Iser binding thumbnail.

Iser binding thumbnail.

  Your Comments

  • Carl: I have found how the boot is buckled has a huge flex impact as well. Boots...
  • Carl: looks like a great thing to have in the pack. Site looks like it works, di...
  • Jack: hmmm. I wonder how hard it would be to instrument the boot liner to measu...
  • Omekim: Ummm.... The machine looks to be at room temperature. They should probably ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Tom, it would be easy to do something crude using a torque wrench on an art...
  • Lou Dawson 2: From what I know, unlikely all the boot flex ratings in the industry are an...
  • Tom Gos: Lou, I seem to remember that back in the '80s Ski Magazine (the American on...
  • Bill H: Maybe SkiAlper can rent some time on the machine for next year's issue :)...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Hi Greg, I did have a graphic at one time but I don't recall it having reso...
  • Greg: I remember there being an image of the D scale at some point – with resort ...
  • Hans D.: Great advice. I hadn't thought about the "quickstep" notch, but now that y...
  • Dean Gagnon: Hello, Does anyone know where to get spare hinges for the tounge of the ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Billy Goat, IMHO the Amer (Salomon) binding is not a done deal, it will be ...
  • Rod Georgiu: Good idea...
  • zak: Any idea on if/when Scarpa will update the F1 to include the tech from the ...
  • Lou Dawson 2: I'll say it. Many Dynafit ski models are built to be lightweight and not pa...
  • Tomas: Destruction topsheet - only 2 days during normal telemark skiing. I'm wait...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Glad you liked the photos, was a fun day with you guys. Main thing, just gi...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Agree, someone needs to forget about TUV and all that sort of thing and jus...
  • szaraz levente: I do not need a TUV certificate brake, I only hate the wire wich connect me...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Hans, the best thing to do is put your boot-binding combo on a release test...
  • Hans D.: Regarding touring boots with swappable soles for alpine use: I have Lupo TI...
  • Dave Johnson: My mind is blown at the binding technology going on today. Imagine, in '76 ...
  • Bar Barrique: Jason; If you choose to replace the liners, I would advise speaking to the ...
  • BillyGoat: Convertible alpine bindings will defiantly have a market (aside from the fi...
  • Lou Dawson 2: My bad Dan, trying to be brief, I'm talking about the boot locator things, ...
  • Dan: I'm reading wildsnow religiously but I don't know what's the deal with the ...
  • XXX_er: I used to think that I MUST have a cuff cant adj at the outside cuff pivot ...
  • Lou 2: Tom, a canted cuff really helps me as well, sigh.... Probably still somewh...
  • Tom Gos: Lou, thanks for confirming that the new Maestrale will not have cuff cant r...

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Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

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Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use.

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