Emery Chrono 1991

As early Dynafits came on the scene, other binding makers attempted to enter the lightweight game. Fact of the matter: when skiers buy touring bindings the scale rules. In 1991 the Emery Chrono ski binding was a contender in the weight game, and somewhat popular among the fanatic light-and-fast crowd. While basically a plate (frame) binding, the Chrono had one incredibly innovative feature: A vertical heel release that was built into the heel clamp lever, with spring tension provided by rubber bands. Check it out.

Complete Emery Chrono binding shown above. Binding is in tour mode with climbing lift in up position.

Complete Emery Chrono binding shown above. Binding is in tour mode with climbing lift in up position.

Heel clamp shown above. Note black rubber band that provides safety release tension for backcountry skiing. You add rubber bands to increase release tension. I doubt anyone has ever invented a ski binding vertical release mechanism this light.

Heel clamp shown above. Note black rubber band that provides safety release tension for backcountry skiing. You add rubber bands to increase release tension. I doubt anyone has ever invented a ski binding vertical release mechanism this light.

To change between touring and downhill with latched heel, these pins slide in and out of holes in the bottom of the binding plate. The same system is used on Emery's other model binding from the same period. Video below shows how it works.

To change between touring and downhill with latched heel, these pins slide in and out of holes in the bottom of the binding plate. The same system is used on Emery’s other model binding from the same period. Video below shows how it works.

This backcountry skiing binding's toe jaw couldn't be simpler -- just an aluminum wing that you raise and lower using shims.

This backcountry skiing binding’s toe jaw couldn’t be simpler — just an aluminum wing that you raise and lower using shims.

Plus-minus adjustment shown at top is for side release tension that uses an ingenious combination of ramp and vertical compression spring. When the jaw rotates, it climbs up a ramp and thus meets resistance from the spring, creating release tension. While not ideal in terms of elasticity and friction, this weighs a fraction of most other toe-wing style release systems.

In all, we’re still amazed that a plate frame binding could be made this light in weight. While probably not suitable for high energy extreme skiing, the Chrono no doubt stood steed for many excellent tours in the early 1990s.

Weight (one binding with screws and adapter): 17.2 oz, 488 gr

Thanks goes to David Erskine for donating these bindings to the WildSnow collection.

Emery Chrono thumbnail.

Emery Chrono thumbnail.

  Your Comments

  • Jim Milstein: Lou, I was referring to the threaded thingies glued into the skis into whic...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Jim, I just count the boot inserts as part of the boot weight, since most b...
  • Jim Milstein: My black Vipecs (from last year) weigh about 500g each, brakeless, screwles...
  • See: Aside from being an ounce lighter per binding(?), being easier to click int...
  • See: Tecton claimed weight is 550g per pair, no brakes? I’m guessing that’s supp...
  • Tom Gos: So, I purchased the new Mirage walk mode kit to replace the older style one...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Thanks Jim, yeah, I noticed on the Vipec we've got here that you can "cheat...
  • Jim Milstein: Actually, you can adjust further if you don't mind going past the "stop" ma...
  • Jim Milstein: My Black Vipecs have 25mm adjustment for bsl....
  • Lou Dawson 2: I'm working hard on the FAQs, but yeah, some of this info is hard to find. ...
  • Jeff: I am sure I am missing it somewhere do to poor search skills....does anyone...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Hi Shannon, thanks for stopping by, glad you enjoyed Aaron's post. There ar...
  • Atfred: Was in the valley Blanche two days ago, skied up to point heilbrunner, then...
  • Shane: I just read that this was previously covered . Thanks...
  • Katie: It was epic, I was there. Craving more.......
  • Julia Dubinina: Hey Kyle, Just found your comment - it is April, so not sure if you hav...
  • Jim: thanks, subscribed...
  • Eli: Just a last width point, I find the "98mm" of the Atomic Backland to be ple...
  • Trevor: Hey Lou, how would you compare the Helio 95 to the Blizzard Zero G 95? I h...
  • Allan: Lou, Do you have a full spread sheet/ chart you could link to us via googl...
  • Julian: It looks like you have the Onyx and the Ion crampons using the same base pl...
  • Miro: It's never happend to me unless -as Tom wrote- the red lifter wasnt stuck b...
  • Tom: ^^^Only a couple times on the non-magnetic side if I forget to "squish" the...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Working on adding more data to reviews today. Just got the ATKs back from a...
  • Shane: I have used this ski for 2 seasons (average about 10 days resort and 20 day...
  • John Baldwin: Louie, have you got a rough idea how many liters of water you could melt wi...
  • Al: Some of the more sober realists in climate scientists think we may be at or...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Old news. And...?...
  • Al: Closer to home, some estimates are that glacier park won't have any by as e...
  • Bob Berwyn: And it's not just the glaciers. Lou, I know you travel to the Alps frequent...

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Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

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Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use.

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