Classic Rando Binding — Secura Fix Touring Adapter for Backcountry Skiing


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | August 24, 2007      

I thought you guys might enjoy something totally retro from the 1980s. Pete Sowar sent these over from Crested Butte. Secura-Fix adapter snaps into alpine binding and provides a touring platform. This was the ancestor of the famed Alpine Trekker touring adapter sold by Backcountry Access. Check out the museum display.

Secura-Fix backcountry ski binding touring adapter.

Secura-Fix backcountry ski binding touring adapter inserted in alpine binding.



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[yuzo_related]

Comments

12 Responses to “Classic Rando Binding — Secura Fix Touring Adapter for Backcountry Skiing”

  1. Halsted August 24th, 2007 8:51 am

    I still have a set of those in the back of the closet……

  2. Dostie August 24th, 2007 10:09 am

    For those who never knew, or maybe forgot…the problem with the Secura Fix adapter was the cylinder style plate. It’s circular profile allowed the heel to rotate relative to the toe, causing your boots to fall out at inopportune times. The “fix” to that was to add a screw through the cylindrical plate at the heel to keep it from rotating. But that was too much home brewed engineering for the average joe to put up with.

  3. Mark August 24th, 2007 12:08 pm

    My buddy Dan had a pair of those way back in the late 1980s. Dunno how much he used them, but it was a beginning to some backcountry adventure for sure.

  4. Lou August 24th, 2007 12:30 pm

    I guess Dostie didn’t check out the museum display (grin).

    Halsted, hang on to those, they might be worth good money on the antique market someday (grin).

  5. Ed Tyanich August 24th, 2007 8:38 pm

    Lou,

    A buddy had a pair of Secura Fix. On one long skin ascent, I did a field mod for him that we dubbed the log-a-lift. With a saw, visegrips and bailing wire I modified a chunk of lodgepole pine into a heel elevator. Looked funny as hell, but did the trick. I’ll have to see if I can find the slide and scan it.

  6. Mark August 26th, 2007 6:28 am

    Good field mod Ed. Sometimes MacGuyver-like ingenuity in the field can yield great results.

  7. Dostie August 26th, 2007 11:33 pm

    Okay, so do you have a pair of Ramer’s version of the Secura-Fix? The Ramer RAT?

    RAT = Randonnee Adaptor Thingy

  8. Lou August 27th, 2007 9:16 am

    Dostie, nope, I’ve had requests out for the RAT but have not been able to come up with any.

  9. darren glick February 12th, 2008 8:15 pm

    I have a pair of these bad boys that i purchased back in 93 or 94. I believe I paid 90 -100$ for them from paradise bikes and skis in crested butte. I considered sending them to you but thought I might need them since I converted to fritschis just a couple of years ago. I didnt think anyonelse had them. I never had problems with the rotating out of the thing but experienced problems with the forward pressure of the bindings loosening the plates. I solved this buy a technique I learned from the legendary Dean Cummings. Straping a hose clamp around the cylinder just in front of the heel piece solved all problems.

  10. Lou February 12th, 2008 9:34 pm

    Darren and all, if anyone has a R.A.T. we’re still needing a set for the collection. And yeah, they’re all some crazy solutions…

  11. zkat November 24th, 2008 10:08 pm

    I have a pair of brand new RATs still in the box I’m willing to sell.

  12. Ivo Burge January 4th, 2010 1:26 pm

    I’m still using the old secura fix alpine adapter, just used it the other day in Toas NM. Lost some parts, so I’m locking for a set for parts ( springs etc )
    Anybody out there wanting to get read of them please let me know ! Let it snow !

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