Vintage Backcountry Skiing Binding – 1970s Gertsch with Touring Adapter


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | March 26, 2007      

We recently acquired a vintage 1970s Gertsch binding with touring adapter. Donated to our collection by Tony Thompson of Canada, the Gertsch is primarily an alpine binding, yet by using an ingenious adapter it worked as a touring rig as well. Interestingly, this binding may have been the prime ancestor of the Fritschi models. Read more in our Gertsch Binding museum display.

Complete Gertsch binding with adapter installed shown above. Binding is in tour mode.

Complete Gertsch binding with adapter installed shown above. Binding is in tour mode.


Comments

3 Responses to “Vintage Backcountry Skiing Binding – 1970s Gertsch with Touring Adapter”

  1. Stephen Crofts January 19th, 2010 2:35 pm

    Hi
    Just responding to your request for Gertsch touring adaptor info.I came across a set in my garage the other day,you are welcome to them for your collection.
    Gertsch plates were very popular in Scottish ski resorts in the 70s for the ski hire trade and the adaptor plate gave the binding a ski mountaineering application.There was a ring with a keyed bit that went over the spring tube
    on the front of the binding when you turned it downwards it locked the adaptor in place.(hard to describe)
    I realise it was about 5 years ago that you requested these but thought I woul;d offer anyway.

    Regards

    Steve

  2. Jeff Ruck March 5th, 2012 7:09 am

    I had a binding like this for alpine skiing made by Besser. I do not know if the binding was picked up by them or simply re-branded but I was quite surprised to meet someone with a set of Voile bindings using the same plunger set up, just with the Voile name on it. The parts are identical. My binding was the plastic version.

    In my experience, I had one binding release prematurely on a slope while skiing at speed which resulted in me breaking my hand in the ensuing crash. Fortunately I did not get whacked in the head or get a twisting fracture of my leg since there were two safety straps, one at each end. Upon examining the bindings, I also found the toe piece of the binding that had not released, had broken instead. Not exactly the “safest binding on the market” to quote the salesman at the ski store. I still have some of the parts kicking around the basement. The stainless steel friction plates make pretty good base scrapers!

  3. Ian Howes April 2nd, 2012 8:03 am

    I bought a pair of skis with these bindings on , second hand, from an instructor at Glenmore Lodge, Scotland’s National Outdoor Training Centre, in about 1980. I first used them with my leather winter climbing boots then upgraded to some cheap ski touring boots with Vibram soles.
    They did release and they did give enough control to be able
    to ski with. And I managed to sell them to someone else when I moved onto new skis with a pair of Marker bindings.
    What more do you need!!

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