Down the Alaskan Road, and the Washburn Exhibit


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | June 23, 2010      
Our crew at the West Rib in Talkeetna, first meal after getting off the bush plane.

Our crew at the West Rib in Talkeetna, first meal after getting off the bush plane. So, the question is, should Lou keep the griz look or not? Lisa, what say you?

We got Joe, Ty and Colb dropped off at the Anchorage Airport last night for their redeye back to Colorado. After a good night’s sleep, we’re headed south with the truck and trailer. We’re motivated to get a Mount Hood summit or something like that on the way back, but as you can imagine we’re also ready to get home. We’ll blog from the road as we did on the way up here, but may have a few days out of touch as we roll through the Yukon. So stay tuned.

Oh, and yesterday afternoon we completed our AK experience with a bit of culture at the Anchorage art museum, where they’re hosting a large display of Brad Washburn’s photographs of Alaskan mountain terrain, with emphasis on the Alaskan Range of course. His prints are old-school black&white, silver gelatin 16×20 inches. A bit different than viewing photos with Picassa on your computer LCD. I still like the simplicity and power of a good B&W print, and most of Washburn’s fall into that category, though a few appeared to be poorly printed and really didn’t need to be hung. Yet overall, stunning.

Washburn exhibit.

Washburn exhibit.

My favorite.

My favorite of the lot, titled Shoup Glacier Takes a Turn.

The main thing about Washburn is the extraordinary effort he went through to do many of his photos as aerial shots on large film. The results are amazing, with tack sharp detail from edge to edge in his large prints. Without some expensive and high-end digital gear you’d be hard pressed to match the level of resolution some of his prints have, though if you did figure out a rig that did that, it would no doubt be smaller and lighter than the gigantic camera Washburn used, suspended from rope in the airplane door!


Comments

7 Responses to “Down the Alaskan Road, and the Washburn Exhibit”

  1. Chris June 23rd, 2010 8:43 pm

    Lou, Mt. Adams SW Chutes is about to come in to prime season. It’s one of the best non-technical descents in the cascades, with 3500′ of 35 degree snow from the false summit of Mt. Adams. Of course you can summit and come down to the start of the route totally on skis, and the views are pretty amazing too of Mt. St. Helens. Keep it in mind when you come through. Safe Driving!

  2. Frame June 24th, 2010 5:49 am

    Keep the beard, very distinquished.
    Give it a chance Lisa, and in 6 months time if/when it comes off Lou will look younger…. :ermm:

  3. Lisa June 24th, 2010 7:34 am

    You look just like your dad with that beard!

  4. Mark W June 24th, 2010 10:25 am

    Nice goatee! And isn’t that Washburn material amazing to say the least?

  5. Stuart June 24th, 2010 10:57 am

    You guys on the wagon?
    I don’t see any brews on the table!

  6. Franklin Pillsbury June 24th, 2010 11:47 am

    Is that a Cheesburger your eating??

  7. Roger June 24th, 2010 4:49 pm

    Funny, when I read the lines about skiing Hood I thought I’d better write and mention that Adams was looking good, but I got beat to the punch! Only thing is it’ll start to be quite the zoo now that the road to the south trailhead is melting out. With your recent experiences maybe you should get in touch with the Hummels or someone who does some more challenging stuff around here, put a post on TAY and you’d get some takers.

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