Double Carry on the Kahiltna, and a Birthday


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | June 2, 2010      

Trudging up the Kahiltna Glacier from Camp 1 (around 7,000 feet) is a necessary torture. You can go to the 9,600 foot camp, or if you’re strong go all the way to 11,200 feet. In either case you can carry a full load or take a couple of days and carry two loads.

Advantage of double carry is you climb high and sleep low. But it does take a bit more energy.

Louie on the way down at night after our first carry to 11,000 feet. Some of the most amazing visuals I think I've ever experienced.

Louie on the way down at night after our first carry to 11,000 feet. Some of the most amazing visuals I think I've ever experienced.



Louie and I opted for the double carry to 11,000, while the rest of the boys did a single to 9,600, then after sleep another carry to 11,000. The double went well though still a bit of a leg fry. Skiing back down took all of about 20 minutes, as compared to about 4 hours up. Without skis, I don’t know how you’d do it. We did this whole deal at night, to make sure the glacier was frozen tight and much safer from crevasse falls. We got the ultimate visuals on that one, with a full moon rising over Mount Hunter, and the gigantic Kahiltna Glacier extending below for probably 20 or 30 miles.

Resting today, but I had time to assemble a small birthday cake for Louie. Lighting the candles in our tent was probably the most dangerous thing I’ve done for the past 24 hours!

Happy Birthday Louie!

Happy Birthday Louie!


We’ll sleep all day then head up to 11,000 again. That’s when the altitude begins to be an issue, so we’ll see.



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Comments

11 Responses to “Double Carry on the Kahiltna, and a Birthday”

  1. Nick June 2nd, 2010 12:01 pm

    Man, what an amazing place to spend a birthday! Enjoy and be safe. Hope the weather continues to hold up.

    I can vouche for the views up in the Kahiltna – stunning!

  2. Toby June 2nd, 2010 1:19 pm

    You say you are moving at night for safety and the temps can be brutal during the day. Are the tents super hot during the day when you are trying to sleep?

  3. CDawson June 2nd, 2010 1:28 pm

    Hope you take lots of pics, would love to see the trip in pictures when you return!!

  4. Carl Pelletier June 2nd, 2010 1:37 pm

    Double carry to 11K! Nice work boys. Great to be able to check into your trip. Best wishes!

  5. Amanda Ramsay June 2nd, 2010 6:31 pm

    Nice work guys! The photos are great. Happy birthday Louie.

  6. Pierce June 3rd, 2010 8:50 am

    “We did this whole deal at night, to make sure the glacier was frozen tight and much safer from crevasse falls. We got the ultimate visuals on that one, with a full moon rising over Mount Hunter, and the gigantic Kahiltna Glacier extending below for probably 20 or 30 miles.” = AWESOME.

  7. OMR June 3rd, 2010 8:55 am

    Very tough to read these posts – yeah I’m a cube-king – the weekends just aren’t long enough. The sad thing is most of us get stuck in life with major commitments that don’t allow for more than a day or two here or there. The American dream is a broken model that leaves one wondering “why am I here”?

    Lou – thanks for living the life, and sharing the stories. Louie – good to see some of our youth still have their priorities straight. A Harvard MBA, and the like, is total BS in comparison to the life you lead.

  8. Brittany June 3rd, 2010 7:05 pm

    Happy Birthday to Louie!

    Looks like an amazing place. Keep up the posts. I read them every day!

  9. Lisa June 3rd, 2010 7:33 pm

    The nice thing about ‘night’ is that it does not get all that dark so no need to mess with headlamps. Great to hear about the birthday cake. Keep the photos coming, please!

  10. pioletski June 4th, 2010 10:21 am

    Happy birthday Louie! Nice place to spend it.

  11. Tapley June 4th, 2010 11:29 am

    Happy B-day not so little Louie, good luck on the next leg of your awesome adventure

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