Alaska Road Trip – Day 4


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | May 19, 2010      
Jordan finds what we were looking for, not without a little shout out to one of the sponsors of course.

Jordan finds what we were looking for.

Note from Lou: Since sleeping high is one of our main goals (we want to get on that Denali flight at least slightly acclimated to something above sea level), we headed up to the Bunny Flats parking area on Mount Shasta. Pulling in last evening in the cold rain didn’t inspire a great deal of confidence, but then, at least it was probably snowing just up the trail.

As they usually do, my eyes opened with a jolt at 5:00 A.M. and my fingers sought a keyboard to type on. Not finding myself that near a computer, I instead opted to glance out the camper window. Wow, the world’s greatest sucker hole had opened up and Shasta loomed above our “campsite” like the gigantic Lemurian throne some people around here think it is.

Okay boys, we know the wind and weather will hammer that thing soon, so the summit is out, but let’s go for a tour! Yeah, we didn’t go far, but anything on Shasta is always a joy and the workout appreciated.


Mount Shasta's Avalanche Gulch viewed through the rising morning mist.

Mount Shasta's Avalanche Gulch viewed through the rising morning mist.

A brief clearing of the skies as Louie and Jordan pause for a breather.

A brief clearing of the skies as Louie and Jordan pause for a breather.

Jordan going to work California casual.

Jordan going to work California casual.

Wind and clouds moved in and out as Mr. Wildsnow searches for the cold snow.

Wind and clouds moved in and out as Mr. Wildsnow searches for the cold snow.

Lou showing the boys how it's done.

Lou showing the boys how it's done, or at least how it is done on little tiny short skis.

Louie partakes in his fair portion of the spoils.

Louie partakes in his fair portion of the spoils.

The fellas take in the view of Shasta's Hotlum and Bolam glaciers as we set the compass north again. Always a mixed feeling leaving such a great mountain under clearish skies.

The fellas take in the view of Shasta's Hotlum and Bolam glaciers as we set the compass north again. Always a mixed feeling (otherwise known as summit withdrawal syndrome) leaving a great mountain under clearish skies. But deep inside we know that pushing Shasta in a storm cycle is a good way to have a bad day, so even though we could have easily done more vertical and spent more time up there, we're okay with being on the road again. As we head up the highway we're thinking perhaps we can get on the fringe of all this cloudy stuff and try another volcano. Check in tomorrow.



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Comments

12 Responses to “Alaska Road Trip – Day 4”

  1. Jason May 19th, 2010 10:36 am

    Nice shots! Welcome to Mt Shasta, a great place!

  2. Matt May 19th, 2010 12:56 pm

    Enjoy the trip guys!
    Any chance you guys could sum up what ski packages you all are using? I’m curious to know what gear you’re using to tackle Denali.

  3. Adrian Bez May 19th, 2010 2:51 pm

    very nice pictures, enjoy your trip guys! :biggrin:
    Greetings from Germany
    Adrian

  4. WEF May 19th, 2010 4:13 pm

    In regards to sleeping high, I have a question:
    I thought you lost all benefits of acclimatization after about a week at low altitude. Is this true? Anyone know how long it takes to lose the benefits of acclimatization?

  5. Caleb May 19th, 2010 7:30 pm

    Matt,

    I am using a pair of 185cm BD Kilowatts, Scarpa Spirit 4’s (sized up a size), BD Mohair skins, and two BD whippets. 175cm’s would probably be more preferable to me, but beggars can’t be choosers.

  6. John May 19th, 2010 7:50 pm

    As a bike racer who has followed the different theorys of “sleep high train low”, it comes down to a combination of genetics and traning regimine. Generally acclimation is held for at least 6 weeks, with a 6-8 week primary acclimation period.

  7. Lou May 19th, 2010 9:34 pm

    You loose quite a bit of your acclimation in three days, that’s my understanding, but that’s just what I remember, anyone have the final word on that?

  8. Mark W May 19th, 2010 11:14 pm

    Way to hit those volcanoes.

  9. Brittany May 20th, 2010 10:03 am

    Someone should ask Andy Dimmen about the acclimitization- that IS what he studies.

    Looks like you’re having a great trip boys! I’m so jealous 🙂 Keep up the excellent blog posts! I love it!

  10. Richard May 20th, 2010 9:59 pm

    Still 80″ at Blackomb mid station & lift access til the 24th. Awesome tours off the top if you come this way.

  11. Richard May 20th, 2010 10:01 pm

    ps- your entry question is wrong. Its warmer in winter in the southern hemisphere where I am headed!

  12. Lou May 21st, 2010 9:20 am

    Richard, we’re there today and doing a tour. If it’s good we might hang around.

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