G3 Cabrio Airbag Pack – First Look


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | March 11, 2019      

Jonathan Cooper

G3 Cabrio Airbag Pack post test deployment.

G3 Cabrio Airbag Pack post test deployment.

The onslaught of airbag packs entering the market is great (more consumer options, perhaps driving prices down while still being good for the industry). The unfortunate side to this influx is an overwhelming number of rucksacks to choose from, begging the question; “which is the best?”

I’ve recently incorporated the G3 Cabrio Airbag pack with Alpride 2.0 canister system into my arsenal (improved over the original system). A number of appealing features make this pack a viable option. Is it the “best?” No easy answer to that, but check it out, could be your pack.

Features

· Cabrio is a 30L pack.
· Completely removable airbag system.
· Separate avalanche rescue compartment.
· Helmet carry system.
· Numerous ski carry and snowboard carry options (diagonal, A-frame, vertical).
· Fleece-lined goggle pocket.
· Hip-belt pocket.
· Storable crotch strap.

Pros

· The airbag system takes up very little room inside the pack which allows the 30L capacity to work well without feeling like I’m over stuffing the main compartment.
· Comfortable to wear while ascending and descending.
· Separate tool compartment keeps the wet stuff out of the main compartment.
· Helmet carry system – I think all BC packs should have this feature.
· Goggle pouch is great for goggles, InReach, radio, headlamp, etc.
· Low profile pack, even when filled to capacity.
· White interior so you can actually see your stuff, what a design concept!
· Canisters are marketed as airline travel friendly. They are IATA approved. (I have not tried to travel with them yet, word is doing so usually goes ok, though having them in retail blister pack in your checked baggage might be best. Word is that while not specifically approved by TSA, they get through, anyone have experience with this? Saving grace is you find the Alpride canisters at most any city near a ski touring destination. So if in doubt, fly without and purchase.)
· Stated weight 5lb 15oz – one of the lightest gas cartridge packs on the market.
· Standard 150L airbag.

Cons

· Shovel and probe sleeves extend into main compartment – this accommodates varying lengths of tools, but can impede main compartment space.
· Zippered compartments are all the same color, which can be confusing in an urgent access situation (ie: rescue).
· Canister system does not allow the user to practice deploying the bag – a valid issue judging from numerous reports.
· Replacement canisters are pricey – $50 USD.

Upon first look, this is a terrific pack with numerous features that cover the wide array of needs from mellower backcountry tours to a more ski/splitboard mountaineering objective in mind.

Separate avalanche rescue compartment – easily stores tools and skins

Separate avalanche rescue compartment – easily stores tools and skins.

With the airbag system taking up minimal space there is ample room in the main compartment. Here I’ve got a rescue sled, repair kit, first aid kit, water, gloves, micro-puff, snow-study kit, and snacks with room to spare.

With the airbag system taking up minimal space there is ample room in the main compartment. Here I’ve got a rescue sled, repair kit, first aid kit, water, gloves, micro-puff, snow-study kit, and snacks with room to spare.

With the pack empty, you can clearly see the minimalist airbag system.

With the pack empty, you can clearly see the minimalist airbag system.

Deflating the airbag system is done with the small screw tool that is also used to arm the airbag system.

Deflating the airbag system is done with the small screw tool that is also used to arm the airbag system.

The Alpride 2.0 system requires two canisters – argon and CO2. Each canister is factory sealed and approved by IATA (I have not personally attempted travel with them).

The Alpride 2.0 system requires two canisters – argon and CO2. Each canister is factory sealed.

Two canisters post practice deployment. The trigger system penetrates the factory seal, releasing the contents under pressure into the airbag.

Two canisters post practice deployment. The trigger system penetrates the factory seal, releasing the contents under pressure into the airbag.

Repacking the airbag into the tight compartment proved to be a bit challenging – always read the instruction manual, especially for your airbag to make sure you’ve done everything correctly.

Repacking the airbag into the tight compartment proved to be a bit challenging – always read the instruction manual, especially for your airbag to make sure you’ve done everything correctly.

The low-profile design of the Cabrio 30 is a win.

The low-profile design of the Cabrio 30 is a win.



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Comments

3 Responses to “G3 Cabrio Airbag Pack – First Look”

  1. Forest Kan March 12th, 2019 10:57 am

    Just want to add my comments here. I just received this bag as my first airbag pack and was skeptical based upon the weight of the pack (coming from a BD cirque). I had trouble fitting all my miscellaneous crap in this bag at first, but after a few items dropped, it worked for me. The snow tool compartment gets a little bit tight with a BD deploy 7, probe, and G3 bonesaw. The bonesaw actually barely fits the snow compartment and causes minor problems with when zipping up.

    The connection of the snow tool compartment and the main compartment is quite bothersome with a longer shovel handle, as the shovel handle sticks out into the main compartment when fully opening the main flap. If you overstuff the main compartment, expect trouble when using the goggle pouch (which is enourmous).

    I was also able to test pull the trigger by arming the system without the gas canisters loaded into the device.

    These are small things to complain about. The pack carries great and I could barely tell I had an airbag on. The hip belt buckle also functions very well, even with ice buildup and cold fingers.

    Something to note: even though it has dual shoulder strap zipper sleeves, it is not hydration compatible as the opening from the main compartment to the sleeve is only large enough for the trigger.

  2. dorian March 17th, 2019 11:25 am

    volkl v werks..

  3. dorian March 17th, 2019 11:34 am

    volkl v werks.. took to a shop , to mount diamir vipec bindings on to ski, after calling volkl, shop refused to mount that binding because rear piece as shown in previous. falls out of binding volkl prescribed zone. took them home and with a paper template mounted them myself.. screw appeared to be a solid seat using a 3.5×7.5 bit and water proof glue.. skied for 5 days at revelstoke bc on steeps , bumps and deeps.. if you skied there, you know there are only blacks and dbl blacks.. just like that .. no problem,,





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