La Sportiva Syborg Boot Cuff/Zipper Field Repair


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | April 4, 2018      

Tyler Newton

Busted gaiter.

Busted gaiter.

The built-in gaiter of Maddy’s right La Sportiva Syborg boot became un-stitched and the zipper broke just before this year’s Elk Mountain Grand Traverse. The repair only took 20 minutes and helped fill the downtime between check-in and race start.

What you need to get the job done:

  • Multi-tool like a Leatherman
  • Basic Sewing kit/basic sewing skills
  • Approximately 20 minutes
  • Using the can opener of a Leatherman, slightly widened the gap of the zipper's slider.

    Using the can opener of a multitool, slightly widened the gap of the Syborg zipper’s slider. Take care, too much of this and you can break the slider as sliders typically are not made with any sort of extra-strong material.

    Prep the sewing kit. Pick the yarn that matches the color of the boot.

    Prep the sewing kit. Pick the yarn that matches the color of the Syborg, this is important with any sort of Italian product repair.

    Carefully align the teeth of the zipper so they are even and then pull the zipper back together. Zip the zipper approximately one inch. This was difficult and took three attempts before getting it just right. Add a stitch approximately three teeth from the bottom of the zipper. The stitch doesn't show up well in the photograph so a red line highlights placement of the stitch.

    Carefully align the teeth of the zipper so they are even and then pull the zipper back together. Zip the zipper approximately one inch. This was difficult and took three attempts before getting it just right. Add a stitch approximately three teeth from the bottom of the Syborg zipper. The stitch doesn’t show up well in the photograph so a red line highlights placement of the stitch.

    Remove extra/excess old stitching from cuff.

    Remove extra/excess old stitching from ski touring boot cuff.

    Starting at the top of the break, stitch the zipper back to the cuff using the existing holes. Using the existing holes ensures that zipper will function correctly and not jam after repair. This is time consuming but the end result will look better than adding your own holes.

    Starting at the top of the break, stitch the zipper back to the cuff using the existing holes. Using the existing holes ensures that zipper will function correctly and not jam after repair. This is time consuming but the end result will look better than adding your own holes.

    When done, test zipper by zipping up and down once or twice.

    When done, test zipper by zipping up and down once or twice.

    Use the needle nose pliers of the Leatherman to clamp the zipper's slider to its original position. Use the other boot to gauge how easily the zipper should slide.

    Use the needle nose pliers of the multitool to clamp the zipper’s slider to its original position. Use the other boot to gauge how easily the zipper should slide.

    How good was the Syborg boot fix? The stitch held and we finished 9th overall and 3rd in coed. (photo: Kat Fitzgerald)

    How good was the fix? The stitch held and we finished 9th overall and 3rd in coed. (photo: Kat Fitzgerald)

    Check out more gear mod posts here.

    (Guest blogger Tyler Newton grew up in Carbondale, Colorado. He attended Colorado State University where he fell in love with backcountry skiing. Inspired by the movie “Endless Summer” he spent 3 years in an Endless Winter splitting his time between Aspen/Snowmass and Wanaka, NZ. When he’s not working for PubWorks. he’s the current President of the Aspen Cycling Club and sits on the Snowmass Village Community Outreach Board. As a regular on the skimo scene he’s swallowed the fast and light pill so you’ll often find him in Spandex heading uphill. He’s finished 11 Elk Mountain Grand Traverses, has many top 11 finishes, and is one of the few people to have hiked and skied 11 Highland Bowl laps in a day.)

    Shop for La Sportiva ski touring gear here.



    IF YOU'RE HAVING TROUBLE VIEWING SITE, TRY WHITELISTING IN YOUR ADBLOCKER, OTHERWISE PLEASE CONTACT US USING MENU ABOVE, OR FACEBOOK.

    Please Enjoy A Few Suggested WildSnow Posts


    Comments

    5 Responses to “La Sportiva Syborg Boot Cuff/Zipper Field Repair”

    1. wtofd April 4th, 2018 9:56 am

      Fantastic.

    2. robin April 4th, 2018 10:55 am

      Nice job under pressure with forethought to document for Wildsnow followers! I pulled the slider completely off the zipper on the top end when overcoming resistance to close it, a challenging job to fix. You are correct on the light touch needed to widen the slider gap to go back on; I destroyed the slider in my first attempt. Fortunately a touring partner had another one. And a lighter touch. I then put burlier end clamps at the top end to decrease the odds of a repeat performance – perhaps others may consider as a preventive step to zip-off failure. In looking at the successor model Sytron, am I correct in thinking it has a more elastic cuff and has dispensed with the zipper altogether?

    3. robin April 4th, 2018 10:56 am

      Correction: more elastic gaiter rather than cuff.

    4. Lou Dawson 2 April 4th, 2018 1:29 pm

      Robin, I happen to have a pair of Sytron here at my studio, no zipper, just a cuff-gaiter. Lou

    5. SCOTTMELLIN April 4th, 2018 3:40 pm

      Great write up Tyler, and congrats to you and Maddy!





    Anti-Spam Quiz:

     

    While you can subscribe to comment notification by checking the box above, but you must leave a brief comment to do so, which records your email and requires you to use our anti-spam challange. If you don't like leaving substantive comments that's fine, just leave a simple comment that says something like "thanks, subscribed" with a made-up name. Check the comment subscription checkbox BEFORE you submit.
    If you need an emoticon for a comment just copy/paste off the following list, or use text code you might be familiar with.

    :D    :-)    :(    :lol:    :x    :P    :oops:    :cry:    :evil:    :twisted:    :roll:    :wink:    :!:    :?:    :idea:    :arrow:   
      
    Due to comment spam we moderate most comments. Please do not submit your comment twice -- it will appear shortly after approval. Comments with one or more links in the text may be held in moderation, for spam prevention. If you'd like to publish a photo in a comment, contact us. Guidelines: Be civil, no personal attacks, avoid vulgarity and profanity.

      Your Comments


      Recent Posts




    Facebook Twitter Google Instagram Youtube

    WildSnow Twitter Feed



     



  • Blogroll & Links


  • Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

    All material on this website is copyrighted, the name WildSnow is trademarked, permission required for reproduction (electronic or otherwise) and display on other websites. PLEASE SEE OUR COPYRIGHT and TRADEMARK INFORMATION.

    We include "affiliate sales" links with most of our blog posts. This means we receive a percentage of a sale if you click over from our site (at no cost to you). None of our affiliate commission links are direct relationships with specific gear companies or shopping carts, instead we remain removed by using a third party who manages all our affiliate sales and relationships. We also sell display "banner" advertising, in this case our relationships are closer to the companies who advertise, but our display advertising income is carefully separated financially and editorially from our blog content, over which we always maintain 100% editorial control -- we make this clear during every advertising deal we work out. Please also notice we do the occasional "sponsored" post, these are under similar financial arrangements as our banner advertising, only the banner or other type of reference to a company are included in the blog post, simply to show they provided financial support to WildSnow.com and provide them with advertising in return. Unlike most other "sponsored content" you find on the internet, our sponsored posts are entirely under our editorial control and created by WildSnow specific writers.See our full disclosures here.

    Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. Due to human error and passing time, the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use.

    Switch To Mobile Version