ISPO (extended) 2017 — La Sportiva Innovation Center


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | March 3, 2017      

Next best thing to ski touring? Another factory post today — getting an inside look at where our tech gear comes from. In the case of La Sportiva, nestled at the feet of the Itailian Dolomite along the banks of the Rio Gambis, I gained entry to their brand new Innovation Center. Check it out.

Innovation center is an entirely new building.

Innovation center is an entirely new building. That’s myself and Sportive head guy Lorenzo Delladio. I’m told he’s the driving force behind this new facility.

The overarching idea here is that La Sportiva brings their previously disparate prototyping under one roof. Along with that, they moved much of their hand-labor intensive carbon fiber work to their own facility instead of a subcontractor foundry. Goals: better privacy for innovation (it’s said “you can’t keep a secret in Montebelluna, Italy”), and better quality for Stratos Cube carbon boot shells.

The structure includes  a manufacturing space on the first floor, offices on second, and nice guest apartments on top.

The structure includes a manufacturing space on the first floor, offices on second, and nice guest apartments on top.

View from apartment skylight.

View from apartment skylight.

Rear of the Innovation Center.

Rear of the Innovation Center.

We walked to the Innovation Center through the factory.

We walked to the Innovation Center through the factory. I’d blogged about this before, but a few photos are in order. This is the big computerized fabric cutting table, used for optimizing leather shoe and boot parts.

The cutter projects its cut pattern down on the table, this is the puzzle it comes up with for the most efficient material use.

The cutter projects its cut pattern down on the table, this is the puzzle it comes up with for the most efficient material use.

Cutting leather the older fashioned way, with a press and 'cookie cutter' die.

Cutting leather the older fashioned way, with a press and ‘cookie cutter’ die. In both methods, human inspection of the material is key, but Lorenzo told me they’re trying to digitize the inspection process. Interestingly, he told me that despite their various forms of automation they don’t seem to be reducing their number of employees.

Now for the good stuff.

Now for the good stuff.

Downsized sewing center where they do prototypes and custom work.

Downsized sewing center where they do prototypes and custom work. This guy is stitching a customized liner for a skimo racer, with a shimmed sole to avoid the heinous weight gain of using custom footbeds.

Over at the boot bench, this is one of the original tries at a Spectre shape, it was based on their mountaineering climbing boots.

Over at the boot bench, this is one of the original tries at a Spectre boot shell shape, it was based on their mountaineering climbing boots.

At the boot bench, checking out how the Trab tech fittings are configured to work with the outsole.

At the boot bench, checking out how the Trab tech fittings are configured to work with the outsole.

Flagship machinery of the Center, autoclave for their carbon fiber boot foundry.

Flagship machinery of the Center, autoclave for their carbon fiber boot foundry.

Inside, with a Stratos scaffo.

Inside, with a Stratos scaffo.

Me, checking it out.

Me, checking it out.

Autoclave tech.

Autoclave tech.

Other than the modern autoclave carbon fiber foundry, Stratos is hand made.

Other than the modern autoclave carbon fiber foundry, Stratos is hand made.

Stratos sole going on.  Lorenzo told me they don't exactly have the highest profit margin on these.

Stratos sole installation. Lorenzo told me they don’t exactly have the highest profit margin on these: “If we marked these up as much as a usual product, they’d cost 5,000 euros!” My impression is they make Stratos for a lot of reasons, but not as a profit center.

Prepping for sole installation.

Prepping for sole installation. I found this handwork process to be ironic in that the roots of footwear companies such as Sportiva involve boots and shoes that were at one time 100% hand made. What goes around comes around… I’m told the guy making the Stratos is a genius.

Finishing  up with a walk outside.  Extensive air purification systems.

Finishing up with a walk outside. Extensive air purification systems for the main factory.

Scrap binned for recycling, much of this is reworked into more shoes and boots.

Scrap binned for recycling, much of this is reworked into more shoes and boots.

For example, the award winning Mythos Eco.

For example, the award winning Mythos Eco.

Circling back to La Sportiva bread and butter, beautiful climbing footwear.

Circling back to La Sportiva bread and butter, beautiful climbing footwear. In this case the Mythos Eco, built in part from recycled factory scraps.

(This post is part of my continued, if staggered, reporting from the ISPO trade show and recent trip to the ski touring heartland of Tirol and Sud Tirol. )

Comments

8 Responses to “ISPO (extended) 2017 — La Sportiva Innovation Center”

  1. hairymountainbeast March 3rd, 2017 10:50 am

    It seems strange to me that ski boots are still being made with big raised heels. Doesn’t this just compound the problem of binding delta angles? Seems pretty unnecessary to me. Is there a functional reason for boots to have big ol’ heels on them that I don’t know of?

  2. JCoates March 3rd, 2017 1:45 pm

    HMB, I hear high heals make your butt look nicer.

    Seriously…that’s a good question.

  3. Kristian March 3rd, 2017 1:50 pm

    Good question. Many cultures have developed without shoe heels. My guess is that they were originally needed to keep boots correctly placed in horse riding stirrups.

  4. Scott McCullough March 3rd, 2017 3:07 pm

    High heels were originally for horse archer. Women started to wear them to look more masculine. Kristian was right, it was to let them hook into the stirrups while firing a bow.

  5. Kristian March 3rd, 2017 4:27 pm

    And since Lou is blogging about Italy, here is a historic ski touring first. Probably a good marketing/endorsement opportunity:

    http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2017/03/03/Skiers-chase-smoldering-boulder-from-erupting-volcano/8921488557229

  6. hairymountainbeast March 3rd, 2017 5:07 pm

    I understand about horse stirrups, and I know heels are also good for tree climbing spurs, but ski boots? All boots have heels because of cowboys and loggers? Seems silly to me. When will boot manufacturers realize this?

  7. SteveR March 4th, 2017 8:51 am

    My (keen amateur’s) take on heels on touring boots…

    Keeping the forefoot flat and raising the heel doesn’t throw off the fore aft balance as much as placing the whole foot on a slope (by whole foot on a slope I’m referring to the effect of exaggerated binding delta).

    If the skier has poor dorsi-flexion, lifing up the heel while keeping the fore foot flat can actually improve fore aft balance. The problem here is excessive binding delta, not the heel on the ski boot.

    There are echos in this discussion of what has been going on in running shoe design for the last few years. The industry has moved towards lower heels (less drop). This has been welcomed by some runners, but doesn’t work so well for others who have ended up with achilles tendon problems.

  8. JD March 6th, 2017 8:46 am

    One other practical application for heels is for traction while descending. The heel bites into dirt, snow, etc. and provides security while not in ski bindings. For a backcountry/skimo boot, a heel has benefits over a lugged sole alone.

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