More Backcountry Gift Ideas — Scott Celeste2 Boots, Flowfold Duffel, and Boot Dryers


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | December 21, 2016      
DIY heated boot bag.

DIY heated boot bag.

Hopefully you’ve been skiing instead of trolling the malls for Christmas gifts. Here’s a few more suggestions for the backcountry skier on your list:

Having your ski boots warm when you slip them on sure feels nice. Plug a
heated boot bag into your car’s cigarette lighter and your boots will be toasty when you get to the trailhead. They’re pricey ($200) and heavy (4 lbs+); cheaper DIY options are available.

We’ve used a variety of boot dryers over the years including the Turbo WildSnow Special made from inexpensive computer fans.

Compacts down to small size, nice for traveling.

Compacts down to small size, nice for traveling.

This season we’re using a portable heater by Innovative Gear that plugs into the car or a regular 110v wall socket.

Pros:

  • The 12v car plug is on the end of a 6 ft cord so you can heat your boots in the back seat while you drive.
  • Flexible tubes can bend and stretch out to reach the toe box.
  • The car unit is fairly light (584 grams); the wall AC/DC adapter weighs an additional 446 grams.
  • Simple design is sturdy enough to stash in a suitcase when traveling (lays flat and packs down to 14″x6″x2″).
  • Heats boots to approximately 90 degrees F.
  • Con:

  • Only one heat setting. Cool air flow is not an option.
  • Portable boot hot air dryer with tubes extended.

    Portable boot hot air dryer with tubes extended.

    Super durable, lightweight gear from Flowfold, made in USA.

    Super durable, lightweight gear from Flowfold, made in USA. The cool little credit card holder and wallet make nice stocking stuffers.

    We’re always on the search for lightweight but tough luggage. A real find is the 40L Conductor duffel by Flowfold. Guaranteed for life, it’s made of DiamondFiber, a strong fabric originally used to revolutionize the performance of racing sailboats. I’ve used a Conductor bag for literally every adventure this past year and it still looks like new.

    Pros:

  • Weight, 400 grams with shoulder strap
  • Waterproof zippers and water resistant fabric
  • Simple, roomy design. One side zipped pocket
  • High quality workmanship by a passionate young company, made in Maine, USA
  • Lifetime warranty
  • Cons:

  • Size is limited to 40L. Make a ski bag please!
  • Price: $100
  • For the ladies, Scott Celeste 2.

    For the ladies, Scott Celeste 2.

    Selecting backcountry ski boots is definitely a personal thing. We recommend working with a local shop and an experience bootfitter.

    A boot to consider for the ladies is Celeste 2 by Scott. Sizing is similar to the old Garmonts. They offer impressive performance without being too heavy. My size 25 boots weigh in at 1308 grams. Roomy and warm, they are currently my favorite ski touring boots, especially for days with challenging conditions.

    Specs:

  • Dynafit® tech inserts
  • Grilamid shell
  • Flex index: 120
  • Last width: 103.5mm
  • Forward lean: 11.5°
  • Cuff rotation: 60°
  • Happy Holidays!

    Comments

    5 Responses to “More Backcountry Gift Ideas — Scott Celeste2 Boots, Flowfold Duffel, and Boot Dryers”

    1. Dave Field December 22nd, 2016 10:02 am

      Good selection of stuff! Happy feet and organized gear can make all the difference. I like the ghetto DIY boot dryer project. Do you have a link to any ideas regarding a DIY heated boot bag or similar?

      Cheers and Happy Holidays!

    2. Lisa Dawson December 22nd, 2016 10:57 am

      Hi Dave,

      All we’ve done so far with DIY heated boot bags is in the first photo: insert boots into duffel, plug in portable boot heater and voilà — warm boots at the trailhead. But, knowing gear-mod-meister Lou, elaborations could be in the works.

      Thanks for commenting and Merry Christmas!

    3. Greg December 22nd, 2016 11:30 am

      Do the Celeste’s have the Dynafit-provided/certified inserts? That was one of the complaints folks had about the Garmont Cosmos, was that they had a janky tech fitting that mostly worked, but were a little shallow.

    4. Maciej Pike-Biegunski December 22nd, 2016 11:44 am

      Scott boots are Dynafit certified now. I’m on a new set of Orbits, and the inserts mate notably well with my bindings (Radical 2’s).

      Also, the Orbit is impressively stiff for a minimalist boot. Not a product specifically for women, but I’d recommend them for anyone who wants a lighter AT boot and has a wider forefoot (I’m between C and D width on a Brannock device).

    5. nate porter December 22nd, 2016 2:58 pm

      Be careful about putting boots with heat sensitive liners or foot beds in heated boot bags. Some bags get hot enough to damage liners or beds.

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