WildSnow Weekend — Fall Colors in the Enchantments


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | October 18, 2015      

A few weeks ago I headed out to see the larches of the Stuart Range show their fall colors. We hiked from Colchuck Lake to Snow Lake’s parking lot. 20 miles. My knees didn’t enjoy it, but I certainly did. Washington isn’t known like Colorado for fall colors, but the goods just hide in the high alpine. A bit of muscle power is required, but larches put on quite the show.

Looking up Asgard Pass. Just up there is Valhalla, and the land of the Gods (or at least some pretty mountains).

Looking up Asgard Pass. Just up there is Valhalla, and the Land of the Gods (or at least some pretty mountains).

Navigating the boulder fields in the morning around Colchuck Lake.

Navigating the boulder fields in the morning around Colchuck Lake.

Hiking around Colchuck Lake. I've never seen it this low. You can see the normal water level line just at the top of the rock above Phil.

Hiking around Colchuck Lake. I’ve never seen it this low. You can see the normal water level line at the top of the rock above Phil.

The shoulder of Dragontail Peak, from halfway up Asgard.

The shoulder of Dragontail Peak, from halfway up Asgard.

Once we got over Asgard into the main Enchantments, the larches exploded with color.

Once we got over Asgard into the main Enchantments, the larches exploded with color.

We don't get much fall colors in Washington, but larches make up for it.

We don’t get much fall color in Washington, but larches make up for it.

Looking off toward Prusik Peak

Looking off toward Prusik Peak.

Our dry winter and summer has made Upper Snow Lake unbelievably low. It's probably about 100 feet below normal.

Our dry winter and summer has made Upper Snow Lake unbelievably low. It’s probably about 100 feet below normal.

Here’s a recap of the WildSnow posts for the week of October 12th thru October 17th, 2015:

Avalanche beacon search refresher with the VIPs of BCA.

How much safer does an airbag make you? Find out here.

This could make a bad day much, much better — Building First Aid and Repair Kits for the Backcountry.

Hayden Peak 1986, Edgerly and Writing Life

#WildSnowNZ — Beau heads down to the Southern Alps for snow, snow, snow.

No snow yet in the PNW but skiers are getting their stoke with these preseason events.



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Please Enjoy A Few Suggested WildSnow Posts


Comments

7 Responses to “WildSnow Weekend — Fall Colors in the Enchantments”

  1. See October 18th, 2015 8:27 pm

    If you don’t mind my asking, what’s up with your knees? I’m sorry if missed the explanation in some prior post (if you could provide a link, that would be much appreciated) but you seem kind of young. I only ask because I think this is important. A lot of us probably want to be in this for the long haul.

  2. Jernej October 19th, 2015 6:21 am

    I’m about the same age as Louie and also have problems with knees while hiking. So far only hurts when I’m doing long(er) distances or downhill. It’s the main reason why I rarely do much hiking lately. Also prefer climbing in places where I can abseil rather than walk down the backside.

    Luckily not a problem for skiing.

  3. Mark Worley October 19th, 2015 7:12 am

    Stunning area, and really like those glowing larches.

  4. Lou Dawson 2 October 19th, 2015 8:24 am

    Jernej, luckily by the time you guys need your knees replaced it’ll probably be incredibly advanced. Already has become quite amazing compared to when they first started doing it commonly, decades ago. I could use a few myself (grin). Lou

  5. Louie III October 19th, 2015 9:04 am

    I used to have issues with my patella subluxing and dislocating. Got surgery to fix that, but the dislocations tore up lots of my cartilage. That, combined with 15+ years of long hikes and other abuse has left them so they hurt on long hikes and descents.

  6. See October 19th, 2015 8:47 pm

    Lou: “climate engineering” and bionic body parts? Sounds good, but I’m skeptical. I admit I’m old and cranky, but my advice to the young ‘uns: take care of your body. It’s your most important equipment by far.

  7. JRD October 29th, 2015 4:23 pm

    Might as well tag Prusik if you’re hiking through anyway!





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