Inside the Fritschi Diamir Freeride Plus


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | December 20, 2007      

We’re always wondering what’s inside these mechanical marvels. Why not find out?

Fritschi Freeride Plus, operation of all Fritschi frame bindings is similar.

Fritschi Freeride Plus, operation of all Fritschi frame bindings is similar.

Before we start, if you landed here because you’re looking to shop for Fritschi bindings, please check here.

All taken apart, or at least most.

All taken apart, or at least most.

We disassembled a Fritschi Freeride Plus as far as we could go without removing non-replaceable fasteners and fittings. Project done for educational purposes and to evaluate binding, do not try this at home. (Exception perhaps being an older binding that’s seen quite a bit of use in wet conditions. In that case this process would be used to re-lube the binding.)

First step is to remove screw that attaches heel unit to for/aft length adjustment.

First step is to remove screw that attaches heel unit to for/aft length adjustment.

Above screw is already removed and heel unit slid forward. Screw driver indicates location of screw that was removed.

Next, we remove two small screws from the cap at the end of the rail, then easily slide the cap and length adjustment rod out of the hollow rail. Arrow indicates location of screw that mates heel unit with length adjustment rod.

Next, we remove two small screws from the cap at the end of the rail, then easily slide the cap and length adjustment rod out of the hollow rail. Arrow indicates location of screw that mates heel unit with length adjustment rod.

After removal of end cap it’s easy to slide the heel unit off the rail. Taking the heel unit apart involves removing press pins and dealing with a spring under tension, so we left it alone.

Part of the reason for this exercise is to ascertain if the binding could be shortened. Conclusion: Doing so would be relatively easy, but would require shortening a substantial amount so that the binding rail could be cut ahead of the existing rear slot, and a new slot routed into the rail. Otherwise you’d have to cut the rail through the existing slot, which would then compromise the strength of the rail as the slot would run out all the way to the end of the rail. The front of the rail would be difficult to shorten as well, though again, it could be done.

Fritschi internal toe parts.

Fritschi internal toe parts.

Now for the toe. We first dialed the lateral release setting as low as possible, removed the one obvious screw on the underside, then removed the toe jaws. With that done, the unit shown above pops out of the hollow rail. This is the lateral release mechanism. Changes in lateral release setting are accomplished when the threaded rod indicated by arrow is rotated using an exposed screw head at the front of the binding, thus changing the amount of compression on the spring, which is pushed back against a stop inside the rail.

This shot illustrated how the toe jaws interact with the lateral release machine.

This shot illustrated how the toe jaws interact with the lateral release machine.

When the toe jaw is rotated, it pushes against the shoulders of the mechanism at the points indicated by arrows in photo above, which in turn push against the spring, thus encountering resistance and creating release tension. Quite ingenious to fit all this in such as small lightweight package. Check this video showing how it works.

Top view of toe area, with toe jaws removed and anti friction device (AFD) partially detached.

Top view of toe area, with toe jaws removed and anti friction device (AFD) partially detached.

On older model Fritschi bindings the anti friction device used to move freely from left to right. On the Freeride it is fixed in position by a tab and two screws, as indicated by arrows in photo above. We suspect this is because the moving type AFD was prone to damage, and rather than change the design, Fritschi realized the moving AFD had little benefit and could be eliminated by simply attaching it to the toe unit.

We hope you enjoyed a brief glance at the guts of the excellent Fritschi Freeride Plus. Now you know what’s going on when you change the binding length or release settings.

As a bonus, a short video of parts in action.



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Comments

6 Responses to “Inside the Fritschi Diamir Freeride Plus”

  1. bergschrund January 25th, 2016 9:54 am

    Hi. I have a repair question. On my Titanal IIs, the threads that hold the end cap screw on the back on the rail are stripped (only one on this model, not two). This is causing the end cap to be loose and thus the heal piece isn’t supplying the necessary forward pressure. I worry if used while skiing, this could result in a catastrophic failure with the heel piece falling off. Do you have any thoughts on how I may be able to repair this?

  2. Roman February 9th, 2016 1:13 pm

    Just yesterday, skiing in Crested Butte, my heel part of my Fritschi Diamir binding exploded, i wish to be able send a picture, it is possible to buy heel part of this binding? It is model 2006-07
    Thanks!

  3. XXX_er February 9th, 2016 2:24 pm

    We had the screw come out of the end cap on a trip, using the can opener on my knife I cross threaded the torx screw in there enough to ski the week. A dealer had little screws which he replaced on both rails using blue loctite, I think they were a sheet metal thread not a machine thread, if you can’t get the exact screw or if the hole is stripped I would try a small machine screw and slow set epoxy, I think the screw backing out is a common problem on titanal fr+, I don’t think Fritschi went to a 2 screw cap until the black/red model of FR+

  4. Nikolas_A April 5th, 2017 12:56 am

    Hello Lou, you mention in the FAQ that shortening the bar is not a likely option.

    Well, it is possible, you just have to convert a pair of XL to S (or even XS). You just have to cut the slotted portion off and mill a new slot. Not a DIY project for everyone though…

    I did it on a pair of Titanal 2s, I can sen you pics if you want

  5. Lou Dawson 2 April 5th, 2017 7:45 am

    Hi Nik, yes, it’s not a likely option. I’ve indeed seen it done, and yes not likely because of the need to mill a new slot, etc.

    It would probably be good to add a photo to the FAQ with a caption stating that while it’s difficult, it can be done.

    Please send photos to the contact email available by using the information under the “Contact” option on the menu above.

    Thanks, lou

  6. Ray November 1st, 2017 5:55 pm

    Is it possible to remove the toe spring with out unmounting the binding? could I just take the toe piece off and then remove the lateral toe spring to replace it?

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