Dynafit Beast 14 Retail Version Blasts Our Workbench


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | December 18, 2014      

Got our production version testers. These things look so good I just had to try out our new Canon G16 camera (merry Christmas!) on a few product shots.

Dynafit Beast 14 could be best termed a 'freeride' binding. In my view, the main advantage is it provides more upwards (vertical) elasticity at the heel than conventional tech bindings. It has a rotating toe as well, but I'm not convinced that really provides much benefit beyond helping keep release values consistent no matter what kind of behavior you're getting from your boot fittings. In other words the latter could be important, or not. Performance of tech boot fittings can be tested by hand on the bench, but not having to worry about it is one less stresser in a stressed out world.

Dynafit Beast 14 could be best termed a ‘freeride’ binding. In my view, the main advantage is it provides more upwards (vertical) elasticity at the heel than conventional tech bindings. It has a rotating toe as well, but I’m not convinced that really provides much benefit beyond helping keep release values consistent no matter what kind of behavior you’re getting from your boot fittings. In other words the latter could be important, or not. Performance of tech boot fittings can be tested by hand on the bench, but not having to worry about it is one less stresser in a stressed out world.

The full picture. I really like the way these look.

The full picture. I really like the way these look. Mature design and engineering.

What's different here is the more minimalist toe that still rotates.

What’s different here is the more minimalist toe that still rotates like Beast 16 only weighs less and appears to be more elegant in design. Of course the question will be asked: Wasn’t this the toe that was planned for the Radical 2.0 as well? Probably, but Radical 2.0 is delayed till next year, and by next year who knows what will really happen. We’ll find out more in January at the yearly Dynafit press event. Buying tickets!

Heel unit (with screws) 598 grams, 20.4 ounces
Toe unit (with screws) 254 grams, 9.0 ounces
Total (with screws) 852 grams, 29.4 ounces

Shop for Dynafit Beast ski touring freeride bindings.



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Comments

35 Responses to “Dynafit Beast 14 Retail Version Blasts Our Workbench”

  1. XXX_er December 18th, 2014 7:51 am

    do you need to put the heel fitting on your boot like the beast 16 ?

  2. Joe Risi December 18th, 2014 8:44 am

    Saweet! In Kingpin killer red nonetheless!

    I just passed the 75k shot mark on my G11. Your going to love the g16!

  3. Mike Beiser December 18th, 2014 9:27 am

    Nice images. How about a review on the camera – in a few weeks. Thanks

  4. Lee Lau December 18th, 2014 10:20 am

    Xxxer. Yes you do

  5. dave December 18th, 2014 11:43 am

    The difference between the beast 14 and the 16 toe piece is that the 16 locks when you are in ski mode and the binding will automatically unlock when it releases. If you want to lock the 14, it’s like with any other dynafit binding, you lock it manually as if you are in hike mode.

  6. Jeremy December 18th, 2014 1:27 pm

    Hi Lou,

    When you get into the bench testing/mounting of the Beast 14’s, I would be interested in the effort required to release the low riser from the touring position. I have found that practically all Beast reviews are for the Prototype, rather than the Production binding, so they do not report on this issue.

    I have just bought the 13/14 Beast 16, and the effort to release the low riser is excessive (new out of the box and freshly mounted). I understand that the low riser locking was beefed up after the prototype testing revealed issue with the riser popping out of tour mode. However, I think that they went too far the other way.

    On mine, when testing at home, I feared for my ski pole tips, and had to use a large flat blade screwdriver to release them. I will probably take a fine file to the plastic profile where the riser cams onto the adf plate of the brake, to make the release easier.

  7. Freeski December 18th, 2014 1:31 pm

    Where did you hear the Radical 2.0 is delayed until next year? I’ve already seen samples out there…

  8. Greg Louie December 18th, 2014 3:32 pm

    “I understand that the low riser locking was beefed up after the prototype testing revealed issue with the riser popping out of tour mode. However, I think that they went too far the other way.”

    I looked at quite a few of both the new and old versions of the low riser, and it appears the change was to add a bump at the botton edge to better push the brake into “up” mode – both versions are (were) hard to release.

  9. Mac December 18th, 2014 6:30 pm

    Has someone skied them yet? Eager to get hold of a review… 🙂

  10. Codey December 18th, 2014 6:39 pm

    @Freeski Straight from Dynafit. Lou has the excerpt from the memo from them posted here:

    https://www.wildsnow.com/15021/news-backcountry-skiing-touring-52/

    Also, for those of you asking about the Beast 14 toe piece vs the radical 2.0, they do appear to be identical. However, this doesn’t have anything to do with the 2.0 release because the memo states that the issue that is causing the 2.0 delay is with the brake mechanism.

  11. Lou Dawson 2 December 18th, 2014 6:54 pm

    Thanks Codey, really appreciate the help with the linkage. Lou

  12. wyomingowen December 18th, 2014 7:47 pm

    Mac,
    I’m at about 7-8 days now most at JHMR and a few on the pass. Very happy with them. Like the 16 if you’re touring the first heel riser is a bugger to free to get back in ski mode. I’m told they’ll break in with use. Also this AM I noticed with the turntable toe and slight side hill I was standing on that I was able to get the heel under the 2 prong vertical retention but not engaged in the pins…weird. I’ll monitor if it happens again but I feel the toe was twisting while edging the ski and stepping down……definitely get your Dynafit press release tix, some of next year’s photos are bad arse…yr 31 still getting better.

  13. Lee Lau December 19th, 2014 8:44 am

    Just another datapoint. I’ve got both the proto and production Beast 16s. The Beast 6 production heel risers have worked in so its now easier to get back into tour mode (they were a bugger before to the extent I thought I’d break the pole tip getting them off). Easier to use now for sure.

    Not had the issue wyomingowen mentioned though

  14. Kjetil December 19th, 2014 9:18 am

    So you loose some of the lateral elasticity with this toe piece that was one of the bigger advantages of the B16?

  15. Mac December 19th, 2014 10:02 am

    wyomingowen,
    Thanks for your review! Good to hear you like them! Too bad they haven’t really fixed the heel rise bug, but let’s hope what you say about them breaking with use is right… I’ve never used a pin-binding, but could you in any way compare the Beast 14 with for example a F12 Tour , or with the Beast 16? Otherwise, could you maybe make some comments on the feel of skiing them both when in slopes and in powder?
    Cheers!

  16. dave December 19th, 2014 2:58 pm

    @Kjetil
    I have them both (16 broke and I needed a replacement for trip before dynafit was able to exchange). If there is any loss in lateral elasticity, its not noticeable at all . And I am convinced the beasts elasticity is a huge plus, will never go back to anything else.

    Again, to my understanding (and Eric himself explained it to me that way), the main difference is that the 14 doesn’t lock in ski mode (And that you can crank the 16 up to 16 DIN obviously, but I don’ need that). For that reason I take the 16 over the 14, even though the 14’s toe piece needs some improvement in durability. they should throw out all plastic and replace with titanium for that price.

  17. Lou Dawson 2 December 19th, 2014 3:25 pm

    Dave, what convinced you the Beast elasticity is a huge plus? Thanks, Lou

  18. wyomingowen December 19th, 2014 3:56 pm

    Mac,
    I don’t know how I can compare for you, sorry. I have 5 pair of Dynafits now, classic, comfort, vertical, super light and now beast 14. This is the first time I’ve had a resort pass in 13 yrs (my little kids are skiing strong now, so justifiable) I’ve spent the last 5 yrs on TLT 5/6 on 187 Manaslu. I threw down this yr DPS 197wailer 112 rpc, and carbon converts with super lights. SO I’m PSYCHED at either end of the spectrum…big guns for lifts/sidecountry and glory only….light rig for all else…anyways…I digress…I’m not skiing too pretty at the resort but I’m making up for it being aggressive without worry because of the B14……I’m seeing so many yutes on the tram with radicals and big clown feet skis…seems like they’re fine too.

  19. Lee Lau December 19th, 2014 4:03 pm

    Dave

    I have to ask because that’s twice you mentioned this “Again, to my understanding (and Eric himself explained it to me that way), the main difference is that the 14 doesn’t lock in ski mode”

    What do you mean by “locking” in ski mode. I have the Beast 16 and to my knowledge the toe doesn’t lock in ski mode

  20. Mac December 21st, 2014 12:09 pm

    wyomingowen,
    Thanks for your thoughts about the Beast 14, I think I’ll go for them..! I guess I’m just a little worried about the feel being something entirely different than what I’m used to on my non-pin bindings. Anyways, like you I will also mount mine on a pair of DPS, but for me it’s on the W99 Pure. Will mount them using inserts together with a NTN Freedom.
    Thanks again!
    /Mac

  21. Trais December 22nd, 2014 9:54 am

    Lou –

    Can you elaborate on what the heel interface is like and what type of AT boot it requires? I have the Dalbello virus from a few seasons ago, and I’m trying to get a pair of these. Will they be compatible? Is the additional heel plate required for the 14’s?

    Thanks.

  22. Lou Dawson 2 December 22nd, 2014 10:26 am

    Trais, you need a boot that already has tech fitting at the heel, then you remove the original boot fitting and swap on the fitting “plate” that comes with the binding. Clear?

  23. Travis December 22nd, 2014 10:39 am

    It’s that simple? I can get behind that. The virus is a tech fitted boot both at the toe and at the heel, so I should be good. How is the plate installed?

  24. Lou Dawson 2 December 22nd, 2014 10:44 am

    The plate is installed by a certified technician (grin). DIY is fairly easy, take the old one off, put the new one in with perhaps a tiny bit of epoxy in the fastener holes, drill two new holes in your boot for the side screws and install the side screws. Lou

  25. Travis December 22nd, 2014 11:01 am

    Lou – I appreciate it very much. Happy skinning to you and please keep up the outstanding posts!

  26. Brent March 3rd, 2015 8:54 am

    As to the heel fitting, does anyone know if it can be installed on a Freedom SL boot? I thought I had read that boots with interchangeable soles can cause issues with this modification.

  27. wyomingowen March 3rd, 2015 10:22 am

    I’ve got 30 days on my freedom sl with beast….at sole of course no problems…my wife is a ski schooler so she’s got freedom sl. with only 15 days in beast but 3 days a week she teaches kids on a radical and the heel bit (like a horse) stays installed permanently…..NO PROBLEMS

  28. tom12 August 2nd, 2015 9:46 pm

    will the beast replacement piece on the tech heel work with the Black Diamond Factor tech heel piece, a couple years old? I’m reading mixed reviews online. thanks

  29. Lou Dawson 2 August 3rd, 2015 7:02 am

    Doubt it, isn’t the Factor tech fitting in heel molded in to the boot? I’m not sure prying it out would be that great, nor that the Dynafit Beast version fit into the remaining hole in heel of boot.

    https://www.wildsnow.com/bindings/backcountry-dynafit-beast-binding/page-2/

    Frankly, if using Factor boot I’d look at other beef binding alternatives. The whole idea with beef bindings is at least in theory you’re going to be skiing like a god (or at least trying to), so using a hacked boot fitting as part of the system seems silly.

    Lou

  30. Ted Newman September 22nd, 2015 4:15 pm

    I am looking for a Kingpin 13 vs Beast 14 comparison for freeride / on and off piste skiing. If this has been beaten to death please point me in the right direction.
    Thanks

  31. Pieter July 13th, 2016 5:38 am

    Hi Lou,

    Although a bit off-season, I just stumbled upon a great deal in Europe for a Beast 14. Quick question, can I still use the Dynafit Radical FT (latest version, but not V2.0) on my other pair of ski’s when I’ve installed the-horse-power-bar-heel-plate? Accepting the fact that I probably have to redrill the whole ski to accomodate the Beast 14’s.

    Thanks!

    Pieter

  32. Lou Dawson 2 July 13th, 2016 7:00 am

    Hi Pieter,
    Off season? I guess you’re in the northern hemi. For half the world it’s the on season (smile). Think global!

    The heel plate will work in vertical release, and usually be ok for side (lateral). It’s pretty much the same shape a normal tech compatible boot heel, only extended out a few mm and with the V-shaped plate below the bar inset a slight amount. Just test it once you get it installed. Only issue is if the corners of the plate bind a bit against bindings such as G3 that don’t have a heel gap. As always, setting correct heel gap is key, and simply test lateral release on the bench by pushing boot heel to the side as well as rotating heel unit with your hand to help it along. You can round the corners of the plate with a file if it looks like they might bind or rub during release.

    https://www.wildsnow.com/19686/evaluation-test-tech-binding-release/

  33. Pieter July 13th, 2016 3:03 pm

    Thanks for the info Lou!

    (And indeed… In het northern hemisphere! :-)… )

  34. Aaron Schorsch December 11th, 2017 7:02 pm

    Hello Lou is there a paper template for mounting the Beast 14? I imagine it is different that either the Beast 16 (different toe) and Radical 2.0 (different heel?). Thanks for the help!

  35. Lou Dawson 2 December 11th, 2017 7:21 pm

    Hi Aaron, it appears I never made one. Sorry about that. Easy to make your own… Lou

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