Mystery Ranch Broomstick Backpack – Sneak Peak


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | November 6, 2008      

A few days ago I received a Mystery Ranch Broomstick to play with. I’d briefly alluded to it in my Mystery Ranch write up a couple months ago. But didn’t get more than about 30 seconds with it at the time.

So, for everyone dreaming of what gear they want for Christmas, here is a tease.

This minimal pack sans-shovel.

This minimal pack sans-shovel.

Shovel serves as the frame to the pack. A probe sleeve with Velcro running its length (to eliminate slippage) is included. Be warned that my 3 meter probe is a bit too large for it. My 2 meter probe is perfect.

Shovel serves as the frame to the pack. A probe sleeve with Velcro running it's length (to eliminate slippage) is included. Be warned that my 3 meter probe is a bit too large for it. My 2 meter probe is perfect.

A small zipper pocket on the inside utilizes the empty space created by the shovel blade. Perfect for your beacon (while in bounds), a sandwich or some bars. I fit an OR Transcendent down puffy in the pocket as well, though that was slightly more than Id like to have in there.

A small zipper pocket on the inside utilizes the empty space created by the shovel blade. Perfect for your beacon (while in bounds), a sandwich or some bars. I fit an OR Transcendent down puffy in the pocket as well, though that was slightly more than I'd like to have in there.

The Broomstick is meant to hold skis diagonally in a pinch or for shorter hikes. Think Highlands Bowl, Baldy at Snowmass or The Ridge at Bridger Bowl. Bindings such as Fritschis with a large heal piece stand a little higher than is ideal.

The Broomstick is meant to hold skis diagonally in a pinch or for shorter hikes. Think Highlands Bowl, Baldy at Snowmass or The Ridge at Bridger Bowl. Bindings such as Fristchi's with a large heal piece stand a little higher than is ideal.

This pack is much more low profile than your typical pack when riding a chair lift during climb up the chairlift before accessing Side-Country terrain.

This pack is much more low profile than your typical pack when riding a chair lift during "climb" up the chairlift before accessing Side-Country terrain.

Another great use for this pack would be on hut trips when you don’t want to carry and extra pack in, or ski with your large pack out of the hut. Ball the Broomstick up in the bottom of your pack for lightweight yo-yoing.

This pack will be for very specific tastes. If you desire a great minimalist pack to carry avie gear and not much else. And it’s quite a step up from using cord to tie a shovel to your back. Look for a more in-depth review later this winter.

Happy shopping, and pray for snow.

(Guest blogger profile: Dave Downing and his wife Jessica live in Carbondale, Colorado, where Dave is a freelance designer and owner of Ovid Nine Graphics Lab. Dave continues to advance his ski career with the occasional guest blog here at Wildsnow.colm.)

Comments

7 Responses to “Mystery Ranch Broomstick Backpack – Sneak Peak”

  1. Carver November 6th, 2008 11:28 am

    Hi Lou,

    I’ve recently gotten hepped up on skiis for those downhill/sidecountry (think Highlands Bowl) days. I don’t see any references to the Solomon X-wing Sand storm or the Rossignol Bandit B2 when I search WildSnow.

    What do you use and do you have an opinion on those skiis? Do you go longer for downhill/sidecountry?

  2. mike b November 6th, 2008 8:46 pm

    meh…

  3. dave downing November 6th, 2008 11:36 pm

    @Carver — seems you are looking for a standard issue powder ski that can still make some turns on the hard pack. I personally use a Volkl Mantra in a 184 length. I could easily ski the 177 as well. As for reviews on the skis your mentioned, might be best to pick up the buyers guide of SKI and look at the 85-95mm waist skis. And look at a binding similar to the Marker Duke if you are mainly inbounds and NOT skinning back up anything.

    Your thoughts Lou?

  4. dave downing November 6th, 2008 11:38 pm

    A quick follow up to my review above. Worked at my desk with the Broomstick on for about 30 minutes yesterday, not too bad (with shovel and probe, no skis though:) definitely will ride up a chairlift better than a pack based on these early tests.

    *grin*

  5. Jess Downing November 7th, 2008 12:29 pm

    Hmm, guess what I want for Christmas… The hut trip application is a great idea. I’m always trying to figure out how to stuff my day pack in the bigger pack.

  6. Lou November 7th, 2008 12:58 pm

    Jess, I already ordered up the snowmobile wheel kit for you, that’s what Dave said you wanted. Sorry about that, I guess you’ll have to ask for the pack next year. 🙂

  7. Patrick O November 7th, 2008 5:27 pm

    Jess you should check the Saddle Peak out too.

    http://www.mysteryrants.com

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