Dakine Concourse Double Ski Bag — The Quiver Carrier


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | December 17, 2014      
Serving multiple purposes through many legs of travel, we packed three travelers' quiver into one Dakine Concourse Double on our latest trip to Patagonia. Click all images to enlarge.

Serving multiple purposes through many legs of travel, we packed three travelers’ quiver into one Dakine Concourse Double on our latest trip to Patagonia. Click all images to enlarge.

In the last few years I have been fortunate enough to chase winter around the globe. Whether it’s travel by air or moving and driving to a new mountain range, we often have many parts to the quiver, especially with mountaineering gear in tow. I always look for a ski bag that is durable, has wheels for ease of schlepping and a few extra pockets for organization but still staying light weight when unpacked. With restrictive air travel regulations on the number of checked bags and the weight allowance, it can be challenging to find the right bag and pack it as efficient as possible.

I’ve been using the Dakine Concourse Double for the last year and have found it to be a quality traveling companion through various countries and trips. Although no ski bag is perfect (mostly because I want it to weigh next to nothing and pack up to the size of my shell jacket when I’m not using it), this one has a number of features that all ski bags should have.

Dakine Concourse Double.

Dakine Concourse Double.

This is one of Dakine’s largest ski bags for travel and it is massive! We were able to comfortably tetris three people’s skis and mountaineering gear into this bag for almost two months of travel in South America. I have been using the size 176 cm and it is more than sufficient for my max size 170 cm splitboard. Dakine was thinking ahead when they marked the length on the outside of the bag so that it matches the airlines dimension allowances without extra charge. I say this because we had two pairs of skis in the bag that were over 188 cm along with my board; you do the math on that one. Also, the lid of the flap has three large zippered pockets, one of which is also accessed from the outside. These pockets are great for stashing odds and ends, shovel blades, etc. Being able to access the one pockets from the outside is convenient at times, but I rarely used them while traveling so I only had to lock the main zipper to secure the contents (a zip tie on the inside zipper of this pocket solved the problem).

This pocket has dual access from the inside as well as the outside. Ample room for odds and ends.

This pocket has dual access from the inside as well as the outside. Ample room for odds and ends.

Here the bag is only packed to partial capacity. In South America we fit several pairs of skis and all of our mountaineering gear.

Here the bag is only packed to partial capacity. In South America we fit several pairs of skis and all of our mountaineering gear.

Another crucial feature when traveling with a loaded ski bag is the presence of functional and durable wheels. I don’t know how many of you have used a suitcase with cheap plastic wheels that have fallen apart and become even more useless than if they never existed in the first place, but it sucks. Dakine put burly urethane wheels on this bag that hold up to whatever you put it through. I have dragged that bag through gravel bus stands, fake marble floored airport terminals and down Tokyo airport escalators and it slides like a dream. Along with functional wheels the bag has durable rubberized plastic bumper type bars along the base to protect the fabric and the contents, and a comfortable and strong handle for dragging.

Durable urethane wheels for carting around, big enough for off-road pulls.

Durable urethane wheels for carting around, big enough for off-road pulls.

This comfortable and durable handle makes it enjoyable to pull the Concourse Double around even if you have to switch terminals in LA because they wont check your bag through.

This comfortable and durable handle makes it enjoyable to pull the Concourse Double around even if you have to switch terminals in LA because they wont check your bag through.

The rest of the bag is made of a somewhat durable and fairly lightweight polyester fabric; this has held up pretty well except for a run in with a super sharp object, but overall I’m pleased with it. There is a small bit of padding around the interior walls for protection (about 1 inch or so) but I usually roll up all my soft goods (ie: jacket, bibs, socks, etc) for extra padding around my board or skis. When empty the bag weighs in at 12.5 lbs (still heavy in my ideal world), which still leaves you with 37.5 lbs of gear to stuff it with before you exceed the standard 50 lb limit for air travel. Depending on what type of trip you are doing the bag might be a bit bulky and excessive to pack up, but I couldn’t be more stoked on how much extra room I have with a travel bag. It allows me to travel with my touring pack as a carry on and all of my other gear in one check in bag. I have fit a tent, sleeping bag, rope, and everything else you would need for a multi day backcountry trip in a foreign (or local) range. Overall, a quality travel bag is essential for most of us on the endless winter chase, and I would highly recommend Dakine’s bags for your quiver.

Concourse Double strapped to the roof of our "Pampistador". Thousands of kilometers of Ruta 40, and the bag and all its contents are protected.

Concourse Double strapped to the roof of our “Pampistador”. Thousands of kilometers of Ruta 40, and the bag and all its contents are protected.

Dakine Concourse has so much room -- you can pack skis, snowboards and ALL your clothes.

Dakine Concourse has so much room — you can pack skis, snowboards and ALL your clothes.

You can shop for a wide range of Dakine Travel Ski Bags here.



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Comments

9 Responses to “Dakine Concourse Double Ski Bag — The Quiver Carrier”

  1. Joe Risi December 17th, 2014 3:13 pm

    That last picture…

    I would put that in the questionable bin!

    Best part is it makes a great temporary casket for your drunken roommate!

  2. Sam December 18th, 2014 7:07 am

    I’ve had one of these for 10 years now and added another into the mix as our family grew. It has weathered the best that baggage handlers and unsavory airport environs can offer and still performs admirably.

  3. Coop December 18th, 2014 8:11 am

    Joe,

    Don’t mind the indecent exposure…we were pampa crazed.

    and Sam, thanks for weighing in! It truly is a quality piece of luggage for what it is.

  4. C Blank December 18th, 2014 10:08 am

    I own one of these bags and have only had it for a year but have given it some great use. Even for short trips it’s great since you can pack everything you need for skiing plus some in one bag, no “what bag did I put that in”.

  5. Dan Nelson December 21st, 2014 9:03 pm

    I have this bag as well. It is bomber. However, if you fill it with two pair of skis, a pair of boots, poles, and AVY gear, it WILL BE OVERWEIGHT i.e. if you’re flying with it, there is more space than you could possibly fill and still meet the weight limit. Features, wheels are excellent, though.

  6. Mark Worley December 25th, 2014 10:29 pm

    Dakine sells a lot of luggage and packs for a reason. I’d like to check into getting one of these monster bags.

  7. JJ January 11th, 2015 12:53 pm

    Am I reading this correctly– you were able to fit 2 pairs of 188cm skis and a snowboard into a 176cm bag?

  8. Erick Goudie May 12th, 2015 10:15 am

    bump on that last question and also there is a flight penalty if you get the 200cm bag?

  9. Lou Dawson 2 May 12th, 2015 10:53 am

    Erick, I’d like to see a clear answer on that as well. On the other hand, once you get the bag at 200 cm it begins to weigh too much even when empty, easily going over 20 kilos when loaded. What length planks are you sticking in there? Lou

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