10 Easy Steps To Install Backcountry Hot Tub


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | October 17, 2014      

Installing a wood fired hot tub at a high mountain, backcountry ski cabin can be done in 10 easy steps. WildSnow tells you how.

Step 1: Engage 4X4 low, tow mode and test trailer brake. Drive rig down the steep ol' muddy mining road.

Step 1: Engage 4X4 low, tow mode and test trailer brakes. Drive rig down the steep ol’ muddy mining road. Click all images to enlarge.

Step 2: Use tow strap to spin trailer around; greasy mud base helps.

Step 2: Use tow strap to spin trailer around; greasy mud base helps.

Step 3: Choose high spot with good views.  Throw rope down hill to anchor pulley system.

Step 3: Choose high spot with good views. Throw rope down hill to anchor pulley system.

Step 4: Tie rope to trailer and front bumper, back up truck in mud until rope binds and tires spin.

Step 4: Tie rope to trailer and front bumper, back up truck in mud until rope binds and tires spin.

Step 5: Reposition pulley anchor.

Step 5: Reposition pulley.

Back up truck until rope binds and wheels spin.

Step 6: Back up truck until rope binds and wheels spin.

Step 7: Reposition pulley.

Step 7: Reposition pulley.

Step 8: Use winch until burning smell is produced. Winch will stop automatically.

Step 8: Use winch until burning smell is produced. Winch will stop automatically.

Step 9: Discard pulley.  Attach trailer to front hitch of truck. Ram trailer uphill as far as possible.

Step 9: Discard pulley. Attach trailer to front hitch of truck. Ram trailer uphill as far as possible.

Step 10: Secure wheels with blocks and raise tires for blocking. Discuss materials needed for cribbing foundation.

Step 10: Secure wheels with blocks and raise tires for blocking. Discuss materials needed for cribbing foundation.

Stay tuned -- final steps to soaking in paradise coming soon.

Stay tuned — final steps to soaking in paradise coming soon.



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Comments

16 Responses to “10 Easy Steps To Install Backcountry Hot Tub”

  1. Charlie Hagedorn October 17th, 2014 3:19 pm

    Step 8 is a winner.

  2. Scott Nelson October 17th, 2014 7:36 pm

    Man, sorry I missed out on that rodeo…..but turned out well!

  3. Crazy Horse October 17th, 2014 9:54 pm

    Obviously you needed more beer/technical advice.

  4. Billy Balz October 18th, 2014 6:14 am

    Hilarious, well done Lisa! Gotta get some winch reps to feel alive! We have a 1946 Willy with a winch…keeps me, grandpa and kids all entertained!

  5. bill h October 18th, 2014 9:51 am

    Yo Lou, from the pics it looks like you never set your pulley positions up for anything better than a 1:1? Coulda’ thrown a pulley or biner on the trailer/tub itself and anchored back up to another tree for a 2:1, then piggybacked a few of those, or pulled out the ol’ trusty Z-drag of glacier rescue and whitewater-raft-un-pinning fame for some hot 3-on-1 action. Get enough systems stacked on top of each other and you coulda been sipping a cappucino/tuaca with one hand and casually pulling the whole rig up with the pinky finger on your other, with the rest of the crew sitting in the hot tub with Indy Pass Pale Ales 😉

  6. Matt Kinney October 19th, 2014 6:11 am

    The BD emblem on the outhouse is not only classic, but hilarious.

  7. joe john October 19th, 2014 2:46 pm

    Looking pretty sweet!

  8. Lou Dawson October 19th, 2014 5:02 pm

    Bill, my cheapo Harbor Freight winch is so slow, if I”d do 2/1 I’d have been there a week. I think it burned up just because of duty cycle rather than any problems with loading. I’ve had huge problems with winches over the last 20 years, both high priced and low. Frustrating, as I’m a guy that needs a winch that does more than ride on my bumper and look cool. Lou

  9. john gloor October 19th, 2014 10:21 pm

    Hi Lou. If you haven’t got the tub in place and need a portable winch, I have a
    Tirfor TU32 and 100′ of 5/8″ cable you can borrow. I bought it a couple of years ago to use with two of my vehicles, but I have never used it.

  10. john gloor October 19th, 2014 10:24 pm

    Never mind. I didn’t see the last photo.

  11. Lou Dawson 2 October 20th, 2014 6:31 am

    Indeed, we used it twice this weekend and even had some friends visit! It was wonderful. The wood heater works super well, but the company that designed the whole thing didn’t do a very good job of engineering the water levels. When you get a bunch of people in there if overflows, then when they get out the water level goes down below the safe level for the stove. So that’s our next challenge.

  12. Lisa Dawson October 20th, 2014 7:10 am

    Yes, water level is the next challenge along with finding another used wood fired tub or snorkel stove for our house in town. Honey-do never ends.

  13. Mark October 20th, 2014 12:14 pm

    Lisa, we have a snorkel stove, our tub returned to the earth a few years back let me know if your interested, trades welcome.

  14. Pat B October 20th, 2014 3:32 pm

    What’s the story with the outhouse up on logs? Are you using the bucket and sawdust method? Separating liquid or everything in the same bucket? What are you doing when the bucket fills, compost pile? As you can tell, this is my next project at our backcountry retreat! 🙂

    Wood fired hot tub may be next fall 🙂

  15. Matt October 20th, 2014 3:38 pm

    Next time just use the Wild Snow heavy lift helicopter.

  16. Lou Dawson 2 October 20th, 2014 4:17 pm

    Hi Pat, that’s just to get above the snow for less shoveling. The snow gets to be around 7 feet deep by the end of March, so all we’d ever dig is about 3 feet. We use a wag-bag system, disposed of in civilization. Sometimes we just incinerate. Both methods work well for short stays with minimal number of people. Basicly a diaper pail without the diapers (though I keep a few on hand just in case). I’d compost but the county we’re in has gone overboard with legislation by rule-making when it comes to land use code, and they’re super strict now about waste disposal. Which means that composting requires an elaborate and very expensive composting toilet that’s total overkill. Now that much Wilderness and river travel requires hauling your human waste around, folks seem to be pretty comfortable with our systems if they have much river or wilderness experience. Oh, and to make the system work best you simply don’t pee in the po* bucket, just pee in the forest first — which doesn’t work with young kids but adults can learn. 🙂 We use kitty litter or sawdust as an adjunct to make the waste easier to “handle.” Incineration is actually the best method, I’d simply use some wax paper and newspaper in a bucket, then pitch the results onto a medium to large size campfire. You can burn the stuff in a wood stove as well, human waste is basically just chewed up food. Key is shedding our stupid western uptightness about crap and just dealing with it in the most practical and sanitary way.

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