Backcountry Skiing Electronics make Ski Touring Safer and Easier


Post by WildSnow.com blogger | February 10, 2006      

Reminders: 24 Hours of Sunlight skimo race starts tomorrow, elite class will definitely be fun to watch. According to race promoter Mike Marolt, there are now more than 100 registered participants! Should be a scene! We decided to go ahead and enter a team, and I’ll be blogging as frequently as possible. Also, don’t forget the interesting job opportunity we blogged a few days ago.

A few folks have asked what we’re using for backcountry electronics around here. Good blog subject:

Camera
Making your pack lighter may seem impossible. You trim a gram there and an ounce here, and progress feels as slow as the morning traffic jam on Aspen’s main street. Fortunately for me, I was carrying a heavy camera (Canon Rebel) — by switching to a lighter one I cut 26 ounces. My new Canon A620 is a bit tougher to use than the Rebel for action shots, but does just as good a job with landscapes and portraits. It’s even got some features that my model of Rebel lacks, such as flash exposure compensation, variable shutter delay, larger flip-out LCD, and more.

My main criteria when shopping for a small “point-and-shoot” was that it used AA batteries, as well as user variable aperture and ISO, a wide range zoom and a fully functional manual mode. The A620 has all that and more, it’s really an amazing little camera. My only gripes are the size of the LCD (bigger would be nice), lack of a point/shoot “sport” mode that optimizes for action, and the difficult to use manual focus. With AA lithium batteries I’m getting amazing battery life, and it seems to work okay in the cold. While you can get lighter and smaller cameras, many lack an optical viewfinder, use proprietary batteries and don’t have a decent manual mode. Hence I’m going a few ounces heavier but getting it all.

Altimeter watch
I gave up on most alti-watches a long time ago; too bulky and hard to use. The last few years a new generation of watches have been cropping up. They’re smaller, less pricy and seem simpler. The Origo shown below is one such unit we’ve been testing. It appears to work fine, though swapping the battery can be a bit tough, and it appears to have limited battery life (hint: use magnifying glass to figure out how the battery clip works). A better choice in altimeter watches might be any of the Highgear models. I’m using a Highgear Axis and am very happy with it. The functions are pretty much the same as the Origo, but the battery lasts way longer.

Cell phone
I recently upgraded my phone, and went for the smallest one I could get that still had an LCD I could see my contact list on. The LG shown below fit the bill, and saved me 3 ounces over my old brick. It also has much better battery life.

Backcountry Skiing Electronics
Choices for backcountry skiing electronics. Canon A620 digital camera, Origo OC-036 altimeter watch, LG C1-500 cell phone

Comments

Comments are closed.

  Your Comments

  • aemono: Karl Egloff is the South American in question....
  • Jim Milstein: From Julbo directly, this goggle is now at $170, down from $230. I've reque...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Jim, I'd agree, for a lot of situations they're pretty danged nice. I'm loo...
  • Jim Milstein: Used the Aerospace goggle all last season, except for sunny warm spring day...
  • ArminusDerCheruskerfürst: PS: I correct myself: speed for me even has alomst no role in avalanche ris...
  • ArminusDerCheruskerfürst: Of course it is important to assess who it is, who writes a review or makes...
  • Charlie Hagedorn: Entirely agreed regarding the steeper fourteeners. The progression of peaks...
  • Vitaliy: Hello, Lou. Do you know gap length on Salomon Mnt tech? I bought used ones ...
  • Jim Milstein: There's a South American runner, whose name I forget, who has bested one or...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Bard, that stood out for me as well! Lou...
  • Terry: Hacksaw, the BD Couloir harness comes in XL/XXL 38-44 inch/97-112cm waist. ...
  • Bard: "smashed the record set by Catalan ski mountaineer and long distance runner...
  • Hacksaw: It would be nice if manufacturing companies would make XXL sizes, to fit ov...
  • Dave Steiner: Really? They changed color in seconds from light to dark. I didn't have tha...
  • Terr: Thanks for the objective review, Rachel! Sounds like a good harness - almo...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Hi Janey, somehow your comment got held up in moderation, sorry about that....
  • Lou Dawson 2: Bill and Karl, we'll try to hit it tomorrow before we leave town. Just had...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Chet, now that I'm off my messed up phone for making comments, I wanted to ...
  • Karl: The Frontier: cinnamon rolls!...
  • Bill: I highly recommend breakfast or lunch at the Grove on Central. http://www...
  • ptor: Ueli is obviously much smarter gaining the advantage of avoiding French cof...
  • Lou2: The problem was schedule, that's why we ended up in NM....
  • Chet Roe: you could have done it at DIA for less of a drive...is a $100 and the appli...
  • Jah He: Thank you for sharing your story! Currently studying abroad in Vina del Mar...
  • Rick: Phil, I run the Power Wraps in my Radiums, two pair, my originals and a br...
  • Lou Dawson 2: Andy, not off topic at all, Plum demonstrates how variable the tech gap and...
  • Mark Worley: Take it to ISPO! Guaranteed conversation starter....
  • Mark Worley: Stunning views. I have to agree with Lou; many trails in such places are n...
  • Andy Carey: Probably will get lost here with all the comments--a little off topic. The...
  • Dan Powers: Nice!...

  Recent Posts


Facebook Twitter Google Instagram Youtube
Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information & opinion website. Lou's passion for the past 50 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about ski touring and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free ski touring news and information here.

All material on this website is copyrighted, the name WildSnow is trademarked, permission required for reproduction (electronic or otherwise) and display on other websites. PLEASE SEE OUR COPYRIGHT and TRADEMARK INFORMATION.

Backcountry skiing is dangerous. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow owners and contributors of liability for use of said items for ski touring or any other use. ...

Switch To Mobile Version