Mr. Rasmussen’s Video, Mexico and Terminal Couloir


This post by WildSnow.com blogger  

After that big weekend of 5 Point Festival films, I couldn’t help thinking about where all those award winning film makers come from. They rise from hard work, long hours in front of editing screens, and artistic vision that drives them to keep refining and improving their work to the degree that caused more than one artist at 5 Point to state “…we finished this 5 minutes ago, enjoy…”

Our friend David Rasmussen is a skilled craftsman who’s turned some of his creative energy to the film side. He’s just having fun with it and hasn’t had his work in any festivals yet. But due to how the web makes just about everything accessible I thought it fun to share a few things Dave has been working on. Sort of a “roots of video art” type of vibe.

Dave’s vid “Terminal Couloir” covers the Terminal Cancer route in Nevada that made it into the new “50 Classics of North America” book. When Dave was working on the piece he asked me for some feedback, and I told him that once a few of your loved ones die of cancer, you’re perhaps not a big fan of calling a beautiful ski route by the name of something so evil. More, while “Terminal Couloir” is a nice line, it’s not exactly on the level of, say, the Rupal Face on Nanga Parbat, so the hyperbolic name ends up having a sort of prurient ring to it, as in “I skied this, now I’m going to name it something radical so it looks good when I post on TGR.” So here is my vote to just call it the “Terminal Couloir.” If that catches on, great. If not, we’ll LIVE with it. At any rate, check out a few of Dave’s films. Fun.

Ok, now that you guys have watched those, any feedback?

(Guest video blogger David Rasmussen’s artisan furniture business was recently covered in the Wall Street Journal. That’s not as important as WildSnow, but better than nothing.)

Comments

10 Responses to “Mr. Rasmussen’s Video, Mexico and Terminal Couloir”

  1. maadJurguer May 3rd, 2011 10:00 am

    I really enjoy the “wholistic” trip experience as done in Frozen Salsa over a straight shot of stoke. Very good editing on that as well…job well done!

  2. Joe May 3rd, 2011 11:42 am

    I don’t think my eyes are seeing things but are those BD tips cut off?

  3. Billy May 3rd, 2011 11:52 am

    I hope the suggestion of renaming the line catches on.

  4. Frame May 3rd, 2011 1:37 pm

    I agree with the maad man, great editing and nice to see the warts and all part of travel, plus learn tips on dealing with Mexican police. On frozen salsa you got the l and i around the wrong way at 6.10.

    Also, frozen salsa doesn’t answer the anti-spam question. 8O

  5. Oli C May 3rd, 2011 1:44 pm

    oh dear those silly pedal heavy couloir hunters

    like parisians on an alpine road!

  6. Wyatt May 3rd, 2011 5:21 pm

    Terminal Cancer has been a line that has always captured my attention. I can’t stand helmet cam videos though. I’d love to see that skied from another angle.

    The other video was great!

  7. Jim May 3rd, 2011 7:38 pm

    +1 on “sick of helmet cams”…they’re awful.

  8. Lou May 3rd, 2011 7:45 pm

    To me, a POV camera shot is just another type of shot. I can guess why it gets overused so much on the amateur side, mainly because it’s easy. Making a vid with multiple camera angles is a whole other level of work, expertise, equipment, time, etc… At least Dave tried to break it up somewhat with other shots…

  9. Nick May 4th, 2011 9:41 am

    I like POV shots because it makes me feel like I’m there. Way more exciting that way. Of course, they have to be angled right and not jittery, and they could probably get overdone and excessive.

    Awesome videos Dave, especially Frozen Salsa. 5point should have put that one in, not only because it’s a great film, but also to showcase some local work and skiing (which was lacking at the festival).

  10. Chris January 15th, 2013 5:08 am

    Music ruined the first TC vid. But good job. Hope it gets renamed.

    Chris. Australia.

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