Christmas Break Backcountry Skiing


This post by WildSnow.com blogger  
Backcountry skiing in Colorado.

He who descends...

Backcountry powder skiing.

Will climb

(Click images to enlarge.)

Comments

8 Responses to “Christmas Break Backcountry Skiing”

  1. mc December 28th, 2010 11:21 am

    Hey Lou. Could you explain how K2 measures their skis? I placed my 187cm Manaslu against the 188cm Coomback and the Coomback was at least two inches longer. As well the ski mid point on the Coomback is 2 1/2″ further as measured from the tail.
    Thanks

  2. Chris December 28th, 2010 11:44 am

    Looks amazing. Any more follow up on the Scarpa Maestrale?

  3. Scott Davenport December 28th, 2010 8:08 pm

    Lou, I have a problem with a mechanic fouling up the din on my F12 ( it will not adjust from 0, he told me it would probably be okay!) – I located your article “Dynafit binding heel unit breakdown and assembly” which is very thorough but what is the trick to get the thimble bushing out?

  4. John December 28th, 2010 8:43 pm

    Scott -

    You can carefully use a flathead screwdriver to leverage out the thimble from the heel unit, just wedge it into the side and pull it out, but be careful not to let the screwdriver slip up into the threads, you really don’t want to mess those up.

    Lou – Speaking of the heel disassembly FAQ, you don’t mention the pin on the ST/FT connecting the bottom of the climbing aid to the housing on the opposite side of the din display. I’ve had good luck both pushing the pin through into the hollow between the housing and the climbing aid support with a pin punch and alternatively threading a large paperclip through the hole, bending up the end in the hollow and then using that to pull it out.

  5. Lou December 28th, 2010 8:45 pm

    Pull the thimble bushing out with a right angle pick.

    As for the “DIN” not adjusting, I assume you mean the vertical RV numbers. That’s caused by a small internal screw/nut either being stripped or coming undone, usually from someone screwing it too far one way or the other.

  6. Lou December 28th, 2010 8:47 pm

    John, I swear I do mention that somewhere… I’ll take a look. But am super busy, leaving for Europe in 48 hours, and doing a backcountry overnight tomorrow… ah, it’s a hard life (grin).

  7. Scott Davenport December 29th, 2010 9:16 am

    It is the pin on the climbing aid on the opposite side of the din display that I’m having trouble getting out. I have tried the right angle pick to no avail. The pin is so small and I’m without a pin punch? I’ll try the paper clip. Thank you

  8. Station de ski December 31st, 2010 2:56 am

    Nice photos !

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Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information opinion website and e magazine. Lou's passion for the past 45 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about backcountry skiing and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free back country news and information here, and tons of Randonnee rando telemark info.

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Backcountry skiing is a dangerous sport. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions or templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow its owners and contributors of any liability for use of said items for backcountry skiing or any other use.

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