Colorado Avy Info Center Benefit in Carbondale Sunday, and Wilderness Discusssion Tomorrow


This post by WildSnow.com blogger  

If you’re around, be there. CAIC event is always a good time, and the WRFA event is nothing less than visionary and ground breaking, as it explores how to manage our backcountry without making it into legal Wilderness (radical thought is not dead).

Colorado Avalanche Information Center Benefit

Colorado Avalanche Information Center Benefit

WRFA event.

WRFA event.

Comments

4 Responses to “Colorado Avy Info Center Benefit in Carbondale Sunday, and Wilderness Discusssion Tomorrow”

  1. Dan Jones February 22nd, 2010 4:51 pm

    While the CAIC has a great list of weather stations in the Aspen area,
    (http://avalanche.state.co.us/obs_stns/stns.php) I wonder if anyone knows of more research grade weather stations in the Aspen area?

    Background: I am working for the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (rmbl.org) in Crested Butte building “weather stations” (aka “environmental sensing stations”)

    We have installed 6 such stations, sort of similar to SNOTEL sites but with more focus on things of interest to the RMBL’s scientists. (BTW: you may happen upon one of our stations if you find yourself in the back country around Crested Butte. )

    We have started talking to some folks in Aspen who may be interested in building one of their own in a new site that has yet to be determined. As part of looking about for a site, we need to know about Roaring Fork area weather stations.

    In addition to the SNOTEL’s and the HADS stations in the area, I wonder if any of you could direct me to anyone in the Aspen area who might be aware of any other “research grade” weather stations / environmental sensing stations in the area?

    Thanks much!
    -dan jones

    PS: In case you are interested in our network’s data: while I am still working on post processing and quality control, provisional data from our sites can be seen here.
    http://rmbl.info/rmblnet/rpts/AKB01.php
    and here
    http://rmbl.info/rmblnet/rpts/BB01.html

  2. Dave Boye February 22nd, 2010 7:52 pm

    Hi Lou-

    This is a new topic fir you.

    The Whitefish Mountain Resort, formerly Big Mountain, has for many years allowed uphill hiking within the boundary. Many people who live here hike up after or before work, and the ski hill is just 15 minutes from town, so it is a real pleasurable work-out.

    The resort just teamed up with the local bureaucrats and issued this policy (see link):

    http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2FbIlu8w&h=1a82081fe1aef3b1f38df6884341ef33

    They have banned the after hours hiking for the most part, except for 14 days after the season ends.

    This is a great loss to our community, I’m passing the information along to anyone who cares, it’s disappointing.

  3. Michael Kennedy February 23rd, 2010 6:18 am

    Bogus uphill policy at Whitefish, but it sounds like people aren’t using much common sense either. Gotta stay clear of grooming, snowmaking and other ski area operations. Hope this isn’t a sign of things to come.

  4. ffelix February 23rd, 2010 3:59 pm

    @dan: have you checked with Western Region Climate Center? The problem will be finding it–their website is a mess. Probably easier to call them.
    http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/

    Actually, the High Plains Regional Climate Center might be better, since CO is actually in their region:
    http://www.hprcc.unl.edu/

    The guys at Mesowest might also be able to help:
    http://www.met.utah.edu/mesowest/

Got something to say? Please do so.





Anti-Spam Quiz:


If you need an emoticon for a comment just copy/paste off the following list, or use text code you might be familiar with.
:D    :-)    :(    :lol:    :x    :P    :oops:    :cry:    :evil:    :twisted:    :roll:    :wink:    :!:    :?:    :idea:    :arrow:   
  
Due to comment spam we moderate most comments. Please do not submit your comment twice -- it will appear shortly after approval. Comments with one or more links in the text may be held in moderation, for spam prevention. If you'd like to publish a photo in a comment, contact us. Guidelines: Be civil, no personal attacks, avoid vulgarity and profanity.
Welcome to Louis (Lou) Dawson's backcountry skiing information opinion website and e magazine. Lou's passion for the past 45 years has been alpinism, climbing, mountaineering and skiing -- along with all manner of outdoor recreation. He has authored numerous books and articles about backcountry skiing and is well known as the first person to ski down all 54 of Colorado's 14,000-foot peaks, otherwise known as the Fourteeners! Books and free back country news and information here, and tons of Randonnee rando telemark info.

All material on this website online magazine is copyrighted, the name WildSnow is trademarked.. Permission required for reproduction, electronic or otherwise. This includes publication and display on other websites by whatever means. PLEASE SEE OUR COPYRIGHT and TRADEMARK INFORMATION.

Backcountry skiing is a dangerous sport. You may be killed or severely injured if you do any form of ski mountaineering, skimo randonnee and randonnée skiing. The information and news on this website is intended only as general information. While the authors and editors of the information on this website make every effort to present useful information about ski mountaineering, due to human error the information, text and images contained within this website may be inaccurate, false, or out-of-date. By using, reading or viewing the information provided on this website, you agree to absolve the owners of Wild Snow as well as content contributors of any liability for injuries or losses incurred while using such information. Furthermore, you agree to use any of this website's information, maps, photos, or binding mounting instructions or templates at your own risk, and waive Wild Snow its owners and contributors of any liability for use of said items for backcountry skiing or any other use.

Switch To Mobile Version