Asolo, Italy – A Day of Art, History and Good Pizza


This post by WildSnow.com blogger  

As promised a long long time ago (in the history of the Internet, anyhow), we’ve got quite a few more blog posts from our month long Europe trip this past January. One of the best parts of the trip was our visit to SCARPA, and associated tourism in one of the older mostly intact northern Italian villages.

The clock tower.

Castello, the majestic clock tower dates back to the 10th century.

SCARPA headquarters are located in Asolo, near Montebulluna, Italy. As we were mapping our trip, we saw that Venice was only 40 miles to the south and we planned to visit. But Asolo charmed our wanderlust away. After one glass of Prosecco in 200+ year old Cafe Centrale, we decided to spend a day following the cobbled streets to explore the medieval square of this lovely village.

Asolo is said to have a hundred horizons. The town square which sits on a hill with views from the Dolomites, across vineyards and olive groves to the Mediterranean. Truly, when Lou and I walked around this area, we felt like we were living in a fantasy land. We’ve both grown up in places that had some history, but nothing the breaths an ancient vibe as the medieval walls of an older European city. We had to pinch ourselves. Is this real?

Start of our memorable visit, sipping Prosecco by the Fontana Maggiore. From 1575 to the 1930's, the fountain in the center of Asolo was the main way to collect water from the underground aqueducts.

Start of our memorable visit, sipping Prosecco by the Fontana Maggiore. From 1575 to the 1930's, the fountain in the center of Asolo was the main way to collect water from the underground aqueducts.

A few steps from the town square, a 16th century building houses the Civic Museum and Archives where battle scenes of the defeat of Crassus by the Parthians are painted on outside walls.

A few steps from the town square, a 16th century building houses the Civic Museum and Archives where battle scenes of the defeat of Crassus by the Parthians are painted on outside walls.

Gravestones and coats-of-arms of Venetian captains are imbedded in the 16th century exterior walls of the Civic Museum and Archives.

Gravestones and coats-of-arms of Venetian captains are imbedded in the 16th century exterior walls of the Civic Museum and Archives.

Walking through cobble stone alleys.

Walking through cobble stone alleys.

Local's cafe a few steps from town square -- suave Italian waiters and the best pizza we've ever tasted.

Local's cafe a few steps from town square -- suave Italian waiters and the best pizza we've ever tasted.

Delectable

Delectable.

Looking down of the rolling hills of Asolo.

Looking down of the rolling hills of Asolo. Industrial area is at upper part of photo. That's where SCARPA boots are made.

Via Roberto Browning is named after English playwright and poet Robert Browning (1812 – 1889) who named his last volume of poetry after Asolo.

Via Roberto Browning is named after English playwright and poet Robert Browning (1812 – 1889) who named his last volume of poetry after Asolo.

Robert Browning said Asolo was “the most beautiful spot I ever was privileged to see,” and lived the last years of his life here. An excerpt from his poem, Asolando:

How many a year, my Asolo,
Since–one step just from sea to land–
I found you, loved yet feared you so–
… Italia’s rare
O’errunning beauty crowds the eye


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Comments

5 Responses to “Asolo, Italy – A Day of Art, History and Good Pizza”

  1. Dan Powers May 2nd, 2014 2:40 pm

    We just got back from a 3 week touring trip in Italy and Switzerland, and at times we’d be the only Americans at a hut. Europeans would be curious as to why we’d come to the Alps, thinking that the skiing is so much better in the Rockies (somehow deluded that Colorado is the place with the best skiing). This post gives you at least one of the reasons we love going skiing in Italy. That and the frickin’ huge mountains.

    Highly recommend Bormio and Tirano as beautiful little cities as well. Lisa’s photos remind me especially of Bormio.

  2. Scott Nelson May 2nd, 2014 3:44 pm

    Italy is definitely on our bucket list. Now to road bike, ski or climb while over there? Looks awesome. And that is a pizza!

  3. pete anzalone May 2nd, 2014 9:33 pm

    Terrific post. From pizza to pasta, from birra to braciola, from boot top to the toe, eating in Italy is hard to beat (unless, of course, you go to Sicily).

  4. Richard May 5th, 2014 9:24 am

    I too am always amazed when Europeans express shock and disbelief that Americans would come all the way to Europe to ski when they have Colorado in their own country. This is usually said to me over lunch where I express shock and disbelief that Europeans would think that they will find a better total skiing experience in the US. I guess the grass is always greener.

  5. Lou Dawson May 5th, 2014 3:17 pm

    Richard, indeed. But the differences are huge, a ton of pluses and minuses. Biggest, I’ve found that overall the Alps have quite a bit more lower angled yet still skiable terrain for use during higher avalanche danger. Moreover, there are thousands more skin tracks and trailheads to choose from. Literally thousands. What we have here in Colorado is incredible peace, but we pay for it in many ways. I like being able to go between both environments, but could easily be happy in either one. Lou

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